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duty to accommodate

13. Services

From: Minds that matter: Report on the consultation on human rights, mental health and addictions

Under the Code, service providers have a duty to provide services that are free from discrimination and harassment. “Services” is a very broad category and includes services designed for everyone (shops, restaurants or education), as well as those that apply specifically to people with mental health disabilities and addictions (the mental health system or addiction treatment centres).

12. Employment

From: Minds that matter: Report on the consultation on human rights, mental health and addictions

Work, paid or unpaid, is a fundamental part of realizing dignity, self-determination and a person’s full potential in society. In Ontario, people are protected from discrimination based on disability in employment. Employment includes paid employment, volunteer work, student internships, special job placements, and temporary, contract, seasonal or casual employment. Many consumer/survivors or people with addictions expressed their desire to work or volunteer, but could not without the accommodation they needed.

10. The duty to accommodate

From: Minds that matter: Report on the consultation on human rights, mental health and addictions

Accommodation for employees with mental health illness in the workplace … isn’t just about hurt feelings, loss of dignity or a feeling of being treated unfair. It is about survival. It can be the straw that breaks you or it can be the hand that saves you. Not being accommodated meant that I had to use all my energy just to cope with the barriers that I identified at work, just to get through the day. At the end of the day, I was so exhausted that I could hardly drive home. – Written submission

Re: Consultation document – revised criteria for change of sex designation on an Ontario birth registration

July 25, 2012 - We are pleased to note that a key objective of the consultation is to develop revised criteria that are in accordance with the Human Rights Tribunal of Ontario’s decision dated April 11, 2012 in XY v. Ontario (Government and Consumer Services). We trust that this submission is of assistance in your development of revised criteria. We address the questions set out in your Consultation Document, and make additional observations.

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