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La CODP présente régulièrement des mémoires aux divers paliers de gouvernement (provincial, fédéral et municipal) sur des lois ou des règlements qui font l'objet d'un examen.

Ces observations exposent généralement une perspective des droits de la personne à l'égard du projet de loi à l'étude. La CODP soumet également des observations à des organismes internationaux comme les Nations Unies, des commissions juridiques ou des commissions d'enquête, ou encore dans le cadre de consultations ou de projets de recherche d'autres organismes.

  1. Submission regarding Bill 89, Supporting Children, Youth and Families Act, 2017

    April 3, 2017 - The Ontario Human Rights Commission (OHRC) welcomes the introduction of Bill 89, Supporting Children, Youth and Families Act, 2017. The Bill responds to human rights concerns raised by the OHRC about various aspects of Ontario’s child welfare system,[1] including the overrepresentation of Indigenous and racialized children and youth in Ontario’s child welfare system.

  2. OHRC Submission to the Independent Street Checks Review

    May 1, 2018 - Regulation 58/16: Collection of Identifying Information in Certain Circumstances – Prohibition and Duties (the “Regulation”) was developed in response to numerous reports of racial profiling in policing across the province, with the goal of “ensuring that police-public interactions should be conducted without bias or discrimination”.  Unfortunately, in our view, the Regulation has not lived up to this promise and, as currently framed, cannot achieve its goal. Racial profiling in policing remains an ongoing reality for Indigenous, Black and other racialized communities.  The Ontario Human Rights Commission (OHRC) is hopeful, however, that through this review and the recommendations that come out of it, the Regulation can be amended so that it can finally meet its promise.

  3. OHRC submission to the Standing Committee on General Government re: Bill 114, An Act to provide for Anti-Racism Measures

    May 2017 - The Ontario Human Rights Commission (OHRC) is responsible for promoting and advancing human rights and preventing systemic discrimination. The OHRC has several functions under the Ontario Human Rights Code (Code), including the power to monitor and report on anything related to the state of human rights in Ontario. This includes reviewing legislation, regulations and policies for consistency with the Code.

  4. Submission to inform Canada’s response to recommendations made during the UN Human Rights Council’s Universal Periodic Review (3rd cycle)

    August 2018 - The OHRC welcomes the opportunity to provide input to the Government of Canada (Canada) as it prepares its response to the United Nations (UN) Human Rights Council’s draft Working Group report and recommendations on Canada’s third Universal Periodic Review (UPR). We trust that these submissions will also be of assistance to the Government of Ontario (Ontario) as it works with Canada to effectively implement human rights in Ontario.

  5. Submission of the Ontario Human Rights Commission Concerning barrier-free access requirements in the Ontario Building Code

    March 2002 - This submission is in response to the Ministry of Municipal Affairs and Housing’s (MAH) public consultation on the accessibility provisions of the Ontario Building Code (the “Building Code”). It has become increasingly clear to the Commission that the barrier-free requirements in the current Building Code have not been sufficient to achieve the degree of integration and full participation for persons with disabilities that is intended by the Ontario Human Rights Code (the “Human Rights Code”).
  6. Submission of the Ontario Human Rights Commission to the Transportation Standards Review Committee regarding the Initial Proposed Transportation Accessibility Standard

    August 2007 - The Commission has grave concerns with significant aspects of the Transportation Standard. In a number of areas, the standard falls far short of human rights standards, not only failing to make progress towards equality for persons with disabilities, but regressing on gains previously made. The Commission urges the Committee to significantly revise the Transportation Standard in order to bring it into alignment with human rights standards and the purposes of the AODA.

  7. Submission of the Ontario Human Rights Commission to the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Ontario regarding the draft policies relating to establishing and ending physician-patient relationships

    February 2008 - The Commission’s concerns focus on the draft policy’s handling of discretionary decisions made by doctors in accepting patients, and in provision of care. As currently stands, the draft policy may in fact lead to confusion and to human rights complaints, in that physicians may see it as condoning practices that the Commission views as discriminatory.
  8. Submission of the Ontario Human Rights Commission to the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Ontario Regarding the draft policy, "Physicians and the Ontario Human Rights Code"

    February 2008 - The draft policy raises a number of new concerns. The following pages detail the Commission’s concerns and provide suggestions for how to address them. We hope that our comments assist the College in providing greater clarity and ensuring that physicians have correct and sufficient information about their obligations under the Code.

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