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Commission takes action on disability rights: Sends six Hamilton transit cases to public hearing

March 29, 2001

Toronto - Today the Ontario Human Rights Commission sent six disability cases to a Board of Inquiry, challenging the lack of accessibility of transit services in Hamilton, Ontario. The complaints are against the Disabled and Aged Regional Transit System (DARTS), the City of Hamilton, the Ministry of Transportation and the Regional Municipality of Hamilton-Wentworth.

Ontario Human Rights Commission urges Famous Players to provide financial data

March 8, 2001

Toronto - Reacting to misinformation in recent media coverage of a case involving Famous Players theatres, Chief Commissioner Keith Norton stated that, "There is a pressing need to give some balance to the information that has been provided to the public. I regret having to take the extraordinary step of commenting on a complaint that has not yet been decided on by the Board of Inquiry."

Discussion paper: Accessible transit services in Ontario

January 2001 - Access to public transportation services is a human rights issue. Transportation is fundamental to the capacity of most persons to function in society. Transit services facilitate integration into public and social life in our communities, as well as allow people to access work, and basic goods, services and facilities. However, certain persons who are protected under the Ontario Human Rights Code face significant barriers in using transit services. While the issue of transit accessibility is most often discussed in the context of persons with disabilities, it also impacts on others, such as older persons and families with young children.

Accommodating students with disabilities - Principles (fact sheet)

2000 - Once a disability-related need has been identified, or a case of discrimination has been established, education providers have a duty to accommodate the needs of students with disabilities, unless to do so would cause undue hardship. Accommodation is a means of preventing and removing barriers that impede students with disabilities from participating fully in the educational environment. Accommodation involves three principles: dignity, individualization and inclusion.

Accommodating students with disabilities - Roles and responsibilities (fact sheet)

2000 - The Ontario Human Rights Code guarantees the right to equal treatment in education, without discrimination on the ground of disability, as part of the protection for equal treatment in services. Education providers have a duty to accommodate students with disabilities up to the point of undue hardship. Students with disabilities are not always being provided with appropriate accommodation, and, in some cases, are falling victim to disputes between the various parties responsible for accommodation. The accommodation process is a shared responsibility.

How far does the duty to accommodate go? (fact sheet)

2000 - Business inconvenience, resentment or hostility from other co-workers, the operation of collective agreements and customer "preferences" cannot be considered in the accommodation process. When a person with a disability needs supports in order to work, use a service or access housing, the employer, service provider or landlord has a duty to provide these supports. There are limits to this duty, and these limits are called undue hardship.

Refusal to print stationery containing the words "gay and lesbian" ruled discriminatory

March 20, 2000

Toronto - On February 24, a Board of Inquiry ordered Imaging Excellence, a printing company, and its owner, Scott Brockie, to provide printing services to gays and lesbians and their organizations and awarded damages of $5000 in total payable to Ray Brillinger and the Canadian Lesbian and Gay Archives, a customer of Imaging Excellence. In its earlier decision released on September 29th, 1999, the Board determined that Imaging Excellence and Mr. Brockie discriminated against Mr. Brillinger when it refused to provide printing services to the Archives.

Discussion paper: Human rights issues in insurance

October 1999 - The objective of the Paper is twofold: to promote dialogue on protecting human rights in the insurance industry and to examine alternatives to current practices by obtaining input from experts, regulators and consumers. Access to insurance in our society raises significant issues about distributive justice and fairness in the public sphere, issues that have received scant attention in Canada and in Ontario where rate setting has traditionally been viewed as a private matter.

OHRC Insurance consultation cover letter

October 14, 1999 - Insurance practices routinely make distinctions based on, among other things, gender, age, marital status and disability. While many of these distinctions are based on valid business practices, others raise questions and concerns. These concerns relate to the existence of non-discriminatory alternatives to current practices and about respect for human rights.

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