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COVID-19 and Ontario’s Human Rights Code – Questions and Answers

March 18, 2020

Updated June 8, 2020
Updated June 22, 2020

The OHRC has developed a series of questions and answers for understanding your human rights and obligations during the COVID-19 pandemic. These questions and answers cover the rights and responsibilities of employers and employees, tenants and landlords, as well as residential institutions.

Disclaimer: The answers to the questions posed do not constitute legal advice. The OHRC continues to monitor the evolving situation and will update or add to these questions and answers on an ongoing basis as needed.

 

OHRC policy statement on the COVID-19 pandemic

March 13, 2020

Following the lead of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights, the Ontario Human Rights Commission (OHRC) urges Ontarians to keep human rights principles under Ontario’s Human Rights Code (Code), the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms (Charter) and relevant international human rights treaties at the centre of decision-making during the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic.

Joint submission to Ontario’s consultation on the 2020 budget: Necessary investments in Ontario’s correctional system

January 21, 2020

 

Introduction

This joint submission identifies concrete investments that should be earmarked in Ontario’s 2020 budget to protect the health and safety of vulnerable and marginalized Ontarians incarcerated in provincial institutions and the brave men and women working inside them.

Example 2 - Code right v. Code right: Visual fire alarms and epilepsy

From: Competing Human Rights

Visual fire alarms and epilepsy

Photo of a fire alarm

Jan, a building manager, is updating the fire alarm system in his building. He installs audible alarms. He plans to also install visual alarms, to accommodate a resident who is deaf. A strobe light would be set off when fire alarms are activated, which alerts people with hearing impairments.

Opinion Editorial: Political will needed to end carding

May 23, 2015

Editor, The Toronto Star

This week Mark Saunders was sworn in as Chief of the Toronto Police Service. He arrived amid a controversy that marred his predecessor’s final days and one that refuses to go away – the police procedure commonly known as “carding.” As Chief Saunders starts down this new road he has a choice – to hear the voices of the community and work to end racial profiling or to allow a deeply troubling practice to continue.

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