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age (18 and over, 16 and over in occupancy of accommodation)

Chief commissioner supports government's move to end mandatory retirement

June 10, 2005

Toronto - Chief Commissioner Keith Norton today endorsed the government’s introduction of legislation as a positive move towards ending mandatory retirement for older Ontario workers. "I am very pleased that the government has taken this step to respect the rights of older workers by introducing legislation that will enable individuals to decide for themselves when they wish to retire from the workplace rather than having this decision made for them by their employers," stated Mr. Norton.

Chief Commissioner commends government's consultation on mandatory retirement

October 21, 2004

Toronto - Chief Commissioner Keith Norton of the Ontario Human Rights Commission today praised the government’s consultations on the issue of mandatory retirement. "The Ministry’s initiative is a welcome step in the right direction. Older workers should be judged on their ability to perform a job, and not have to leave their work just because they reach a certain age," stated Chief Commissioner Keith Norton.

Submission of the Ontario Human Rights Commission to the Ministry of Labour regarding the consultations on ending mandatory retirement

September 2004 - This submission is in response to the Ministry of Labour’s public consultation on ending mandatory retirement.The Ontario Human Rights Commission (“OHRC”) commends the Ministry for these steps towards ending mandatory retirement.

Ontario Human Rights Commission partners with Shoppers Drug Mart and CARP, Canada's Association for the Fifty-Plus, to promote human rights for older persons

July 25, 2003

Toronto - The Ontario Human Rights Commission today launched a public awareness campaign to counteract myths and stereotypes about older persons, in partnership with Shoppers Drug Mart and CARP, Canada’s Association for the Fifty-Plus.

Chief Commissioner commends plans to allow flexibility and choice in retirement

May 30, 2003

Toronto - Chief Commissioner Keith Norton of the Ontario Human Rights Commission today praised the government's move to act on providing more flexibility and choice in the area of retirement. This is consistent with the Commission's recommendation made in June 2001 for Ontario workers aged 65 or older. "The Bill introduced by the government yesterday respecting the age of retirement is significant and a step in the right direction. For some older workers, maintaining or even obtaining employment can have profound implications on their sense of worth, their dignity and their economic security. They should be judged on their ability to perform a job, and not have to leave their work just because they reach a certain age," stated Chief Commissioner Keith Norton, adding that, "Although the Bill provides for a transition period until January 1, 2005, it does not prevent any forward-looking employer and bargaining agent from implementing the provisions before that date."

Advancing Human Rights for older persons

June 13, 2002

Toronto - The Ontario Human Rights Commission today released its Policy on Discrimination against Older Persons because of Age. This document provides an in-depth look at age discrimination as it relates to present protections in the Human Rights Code. The Policy was developed to help the public and Commission staff to gain a better understanding of how the Code protects older Ontarians and to sensitize them to the issues faced by these persons. It also aims to raise awareness among service providers, employers and landlords of their obligations under the Code.

Ageism and age discrimination (fact sheet)

2002 - Ageism is often a cause for individual acts of age discrimination and also discrimination that is more systemic in nature, such as in the design and implementation of services, programs and facilities. Age discrimination involves treating persons in an unequal fashion due to age in a way that is contrary to human rights law. The Ontario Human Rights Code prohibits age discrimination in: employment, housing accommodation, goods, services and facilities, contracts and membership in trade and vocational associations.

Age discrimination and transit (fact sheet)

2002 - Under the Ontario Human Rights Code, transit service providers have a legal responsibility to ensure that transit systems are accessible to all Ontarians. Many older persons depend of public transit services to go to work, to get to medical appointments, to go to the grocery store, to participate in recreational activities and to visit family and friends. Transit services that are not accessible can cause isolation and prevent participation of older persons in our communities.

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