Language selector

policy development

OHRC releases consultation report on human rights, mental health and addictions

September 13, 2012

Toronto – The Ontario Human Rights Commission (OHRC) today released Minds that matter: Report on the consultation on human rights, mental health and addictions. This report outlines what the OHRC heard in its largest-ever policy consultation across Ontario, and sets out a number of key recommendations and OHRC commitments to address human rights issues that affect people with mental health disabilities or addictions.

3. OHRC Methodology

From: Minds that matter: Report on the consultation on human rights, mental health and addictions

In 2009, to establish a plan to address systemic discrimination based on mental health, the OHRC developed and released a consultation paper, received written submissions and conducted in-depth interviews. This feedback led the OHRC to hold a consultation to develop a policy on human rights and mental health. The policy consultation took place over several months in 2010 and 2011. It included interviews, focus groups, round-table sessions (in Toronto, Windsor, Ottawa and North Bay), a call for written submissions and an online and mail-in survey.

Minds that matter: Report on the consultation on human rights, mental health and addictions

September 2012 - Minds that Matter reports the findings from the Ontario Human Rights Commission’s (OHRC) province-wide consultation on the human rights issues experienced by people with mental health disabilities or addictions. It provides a summary of what we heard from more than 1,500 individuals and organizations across Ontario and sets out a number of key recommendations and OHRC commitments.

Human rights and creed

September 2013 - The Ontario Human Rights Commission (OHRC) is updating its Policy on Creed and the Accommodation of Religious Observances. This page provides some general background information about the update, and what may be changing in the updated policy. It will be revised as the creed project evolves.

Appendix B: Policy development process

From: Policy on competing human rights

Over the past several years, the OHRC has taken many steps to advance understanding of how best to address competing rights. In 2005, the OHRC began the dialogue by releasing a research paper entitled, Balancing Conflicting Rights: Towards an Analytical Framework.[97] The paper provided the public with preliminary information that would promote discussion and further research without taking any firm policy positions.

Next steps

From: Public consultation paper: Human rights and mental health strategy

The OHRC welcomes your feedback related to the areas of concern identified and/or specific interventions that it should consider undertaking.

Please feel free to comment on any of the information provided in this paper, or on the questions identified below:

Within the Areas of Concern identified above, are there priority areas that the OHRC should consider in its strategy?

Within the Areas of Concern identified above, are there priority initiatives that the OHRC should consider undertaking? 

Religious rights (fact sheet)

Under the Ontario Human Rights Code, discrimination because of religion (creed) is against the law. Everyone should have access to the same opportunities and benefits, and be treated with equal dignity and respect, regardless of their religion. Religion includes the practices, beliefs and observances that are part of a faith or religion. It does not include personal moral, ethical or political views. Nor does it include religions that promote violence or hate towards others, or that violate criminal law.

Reconciling rights

As people better understand their rights and wish to exercise them, some of those rights may come into conflict with the rights of others. Depending on the circumstances, for example, the right to be free from discrimination based on creed or sexual orientation or gender may be at odds with each other or with other rights, laws and practices. Can a religious employer require an employee to sign a “morality pledge” not to engage in certain sexual activity? Can an accuser testify at the criminal trial of her accused wearing a niqab?

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - policy development