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Submission of the Ontario Human Rights Commission to the Ministry of the Solicitor General on the proposed amendments to the segregation provisions in Regulation 778 under the Ministry of Correctional Services Act

September 24, 2019

On August 26, 2019, Ontario’s Ministry of the Solicitor General (the Ministry) announced proposed amendments to Regulation 778 under the Ministry of Correctional Services Act. The Ontario Human Rights Commission (OHRC) welcomes the opportunity to provide this submission on the amendments related to segregation.

Ontario Human Rights Commission Submission to the Toronto Police Services Board re: Draft Policy on Race-Based Data Collection, Analysis and Public Reporting

September 4, 2019

The Ontario Human Rights Commission (OHRC) welcomes the opportunity to provide a submission to the Toronto Police Services Board (TPSB) on its Draft Policy on Race-Based Data Collection, Analysis and Public Reporting (Draft Policy).

Submission to inform Canada’s response to recommendations made during the UN Human Rights Council’s Universal Periodic Review (3rd cycle)

August 2018 - The OHRC welcomes the opportunity to provide input to the Government of Canada (Canada) as it prepares its response to the United Nations (UN) Human Rights Council’s draft Working Group report and recommendations on Canada’s third Universal Periodic Review (UPR). We trust that these submissions will also be of assistance to the Government of Ontario (Ontario) as it works with Canada to effectively implement human rights in Ontario.

OHRC Submission to the Independent Street Checks Review

May 1, 2018 - Regulation 58/16: Collection of Identifying Information in Certain Circumstances – Prohibition and Duties (the “Regulation”) was developed in response to numerous reports of racial profiling in policing across the province, with the goal of “ensuring that police-public interactions should be conducted without bias or discrimination”.  Unfortunately, in our view, the Regulation has not lived up to this promise and, as currently framed, cannot achieve its goal. Racial profiling in policing remains an ongoing reality for Indigenous, Black and other racialized communities.  The Ontario Human Rights Commission (OHRC) is hopeful, however, that through this review and the recommendations that come out of it, the Regulation can be amended so that it can finally meet its promise.

OHRC submission to the Standing Committee on General Government re: Bill 114, An Act to provide for Anti-Racism Measures

May 2017 - The Ontario Human Rights Commission (OHRC) is responsible for promoting and advancing human rights and preventing systemic discrimination. The OHRC has several functions under the Ontario Human Rights Code (Code), including the power to monitor and report on anything related to the state of human rights in Ontario. This includes reviewing legislation, regulations and policies for consistency with the Code.

Submission regarding Bill 89, Supporting Children, Youth and Families Act, 2017

April 3, 2017 - The Ontario Human Rights Commission (OHRC) welcomes the introduction of Bill 89, Supporting Children, Youth and Families Act, 2017. The Bill responds to human rights concerns raised by the OHRC about various aspects of Ontario’s child welfare system,[1] including the overrepresentation of Indigenous and racialized children and youth in Ontario’s child welfare system.

OHRC Submission to the Independent Review of Police Oversight Bodies

November 2016 - For nearly two decades, the Ontario Human Rights Commission (OHRC) has raised concerns about systemic discrimination that are part of the culture of policing in our province. There have been far too many instances of racial profiling, discriminatory use of force on people with mental health disabilities and/or addictions, and racism and sexism in investigations of missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls in Ontario to ignore. These incidents and related concerns have sparked multiple coroner’s inquests, recommendations, reviews and reports, stretching back for decades. Yet they all have failed to eliminate systemic discrimination in policing.

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