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  1. 4. Discussion

    From: By the Numbers: A statistical profile of people with mental health and addiction disabilities in Ontario

    Ontarians with disabilities, especially people with mental health and addiction disabilities, continue to face disparities on several social and economic indicators compared to people without disabilities. They have a higher unemployment rate, are more likely to be in low income status, have lower educational levels and are less likely to live in adequate, affordable housing.

  2. Areas for further research

    From: By the Numbers: A statistical profile of people with mental health and addiction disabilities in Ontario

    More information on the lives of people with mental health and addiction disabilities could be collected on other variables. For example, contact with the criminal justice system is an important indicator of marginalization and social exclusion.[42] Similarly, knowing what proportion of this group live in collective dwellings (such as hospitals, group homes and lodging houses) or are homeless across Ontario would provide a better understanding of their housing needs.  

  3. Appendix A: Glossary of terms

    From: By the Numbers: A statistical profile of people with mental health and addiction disabilities in Ontario

    Census family: A married couple and the children, if any, of either or both spouses; a couple living common-law and the children, if any, of either or both partners; or, a lone parent of any marital status with at least one child living in the same dwelling and the child or children. All members of a particular census family live in the same dwelling. A couple may be of opposite or same sex.

  4. New OHRC report takes fresh look at experiences of people with mental health and addictions disabilities

    October 5, 2015

    Toronto–The Ontario Human Rights Commission today launched By the numbers, a new report offering a statistical profile of people with mental health and addiction disabilities in Ontario. This launch was part of Taking it Local Peel, a one-day training event co-hosted by the United Way of Peel Region and the Regional Diversity Roundtable of Peel.

  5. Ontario Shores Launches Exciting New Project with the Ontario Human Rights Commission

    October 16, 2015

    (Whitby, ON) – Today, Ontario Shores Centre for Mental Health Sciences (Ontario Shores) and the Ontario Human Rights Commission unveiled a new partnership to further develop human rights capacity at the specialty mental health centre.

    Ontario Shores and the OHRC met last year to look at an opportunity to partner and support both organizations’ mission and values. The Project Charter signed today sets the framework for work that will happen over a three year term.

  6. Op-Ed in the Hamilton Spectator commenting on “Carding is basic investigative work, Hamilton officers say”

    October 29, 2015

    Hamilton police chief Glenn De Caire's position on carding and street checks contains a fundamental and significant error.

    In his September 21 letter to the Minister of Community Safety and Correctional Services, Chief De Caire cites the Ontario Human Rights Commission and our recognition of “the importance of officer discretion.” We agree that discretion is important – vitally so. But we have always been clear: officer discretion must be informed and guided to prevent racial profiling – and discretionary decisions that are informed by racial bias should lead to officer discipline. 

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