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  1. Call for contributions: Indigenous Peoples and human rights

    Oct. 30, 2017 - From February 21 to 23, 2018, the Ontario Human Rights Commission and Osgoode Hall Law School of York University, in collaboration with Indigenous knowledge keepers, academics and organizations, will host and engage in a dialogue to explore both Indigenous and Western constitutional legal and policy approaches to “human rights” and “equality.” Event organizers include staff from the Chiefs of Ontario as well as Indigenous academics Karen Drake (Métis Nation of Ontario, Osgoode Hall Law School, York University) and Jeffery Hewitt (Cree, Faculty of Law, University of Windsor).

  2. Letter to Minister Naqvi re: Support for Bill 164, Human Rights Code Amendment Act, 2017

    October 24, 2017

    I am writing to express the Ontario Human Rights Commission’s (OHRC) support for Bill 164, which was introduced on October 4, 2017 in the Legislature. We understand that the Second Reading will take place on October 26. As I expressed in our meeting on October 2, it is the OHRC’s position that Bill 164 improves the Human Rights Code by including new grounds of protection for people under social condition, police records, genetic characteristics, and immigration status.

  3. Deputation to the Toronto Police Services Board on conducted energy weapons

    October 19, 2017

    The Ontario Human Rights Commission (OHRC) makes the following deputation in response to the Toronto Police Service’s (TPS) Discussion Paper in which it proposes to expand the deployment of Conducted Energy Weapons (CEWs) to on-duty primary response unit constables and on-duty constables from designated specialized units.

  4. Mental health disabilities shouldn’t be a barrier to student success

    October 12, 2017

    Just as students were headed back to school, a vigorous debate was unfolding on the pages of this paper (and others) about the accommodation of students with mental health disabilities. Unfortunately, this debate has been dominated by professors and columnists whose expertise lies outside human rights law and whose opinions do not adequately take into account the lived experience of discrimination.

  5. Policy statement on the duty to accommodate under the Ontario Human Rights Code

    The Ontario Human Rights Code (the Code) recognizes the dignity and worth of every person in Ontario. The Code provides for equal rights and opportunities, and freedom from discrimination. It applies to the areas of employment, housing, facilities and services (including education, health care, etc.), contracts, and membership in unions, trade or professional associations. It covers specific grounds, such as disability, creed, family status, sex, and gender identity.

  6. OHRC calls for government accountability to advance the human rights of prisoners with mental health disabilities

    September 26, 2017

    Toronto – Today, the Ontario Human Rights Commission (OHRC) announced new legal action to advance the human rights of prisoners with mental health disabilities in Ontario’s correctional facilities at a press conference at Queen’s Park.

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