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  1. Policy on drug and alcohol testing

    September 2000 - Drug and alcohol testing are of particular concern in the workplace, notably for those Ontario employers that have safety sensitive operations, and/or that are subject to U.S. regulatory requirements (e.g. the trucking industry) or to the policies of U.S. affiliates with “zero tolerance” for the consumption of drugs or alcohol. For this reason, this Policy focuses on the workplace. However, it applies to other social areas as well.
  2. Policy and guidelines on disability and the duty to accommodate

    November 2000 - Under the Code, everyone has the right to be free from discrimination because of disability or perceived disability in the social areas of employment, services, goods, facilities, housing, contracts and membership in trade and vocational associations. This right means that persons with disabilities have the right to equal treatment, which includes the right to accessible workplaces, public transit, health services, restaurants, shops and housing.
  3. Policy on discrimination and harassment because of sexual orientation

    January 2006 - This policy sets out the position of the OHRC with respect to sexual orientation at the time of publication, and replaces the OHRC’s earlier policy, approved in January 2000. The policy was developed based on extensive research and community consultations, and was updated in 2006 to reflect the significant legal and legislative changes that took place after the initial document was approved. This policy deals primarily with issues that could form the basis of a human rights claim of discrimination. The policy is therefore bounded by the provisions of the Code and Canada’s legal framework for analyzing discrimination. At the same time, the policy interprets the protections in the Code in a broad and purposive manner.
  4. Human rights commissions: Future directions

    February 2000 - On February 28, 2000, the Ontario Human Rights Commission and the Canadian Human Rights Foundation held a one-day Policy Dialogue session: Human Rights Commissions: Future Directions. As we begin the new millennium, it is an ideal time to consider the role of human rights institutions in a broader context. It is important for human rights institutions and those who work in the area to identify the issues that are facing human rights commissions and to develop strategies that will allow them to play a greater role in the protection and promotion of human rights.
  5. Time for action: Advancing human rights for older Ontarians

    June 2001 - Time For Action: Advancing the Rights of Older Persons in Ontario is the final Report on the Ontario Human Rights Commission's extensive research and consultation on human rights issues facing older Ontarians. The Report presents an overview of what the Commission heard from over 100 organizations and individuals from across the province. It outlines recommendations for government and community action derived from the suggestions of the consultees, as well as “Commission Commitments”, - steps that the Commission will take toward eliminating ageism and age discrimination in the province of Ontario.
  6. Human rights commissions and economic and social rights

    2001 - This paper is one of several initiatives by the Ontario Human Rights Commission to explore ways in which human rights commissions can become more involved in protecting and promoting economic and social rights and in implementing international treaties to which Canada is a party. The challenge for human rights commissions is to find ways to maximize the potential of their mandates to promote international standards, including those contained in the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights.
  7. Consultation report: Human rights issues in insurance

    October 2001 - In October 1999, the Ontario Human Rights Commission released a Discussion Paper for public consultation entitled Human Rights Issues in Insurance. This Consultation Report summarizes comments and viewpoints that were communicated to the Commission. The Report also examines possible directions to ensure human rights issues in insurance continue to receive attention in the future. A summary of relevant Code sections and selected case law is included in the appendices.
  8. Policy on discrimination against older people because of age

    February 2007 - This policy sets out the OHRC’s position on discrimination against older persons as it relates to the provisions of the Code. It deals only with issues that fall within Parts I and II of the Code and that could form the basis of a human rights claim. Time for Action contains a broader examination of social policy and other issues which must be addressed through positive action by government and community partners. In addition, the OHRC is engaged in, and will continue to undertake, initiatives to address broader human rights issues related to age.
  9. Consultation report: Human rights and public transit services in Ontario

    March 2002 - This Report is based on the many and varying viewpoints presented to the OHRC in the course of its public consultation on accessible public transportation in Ontario. Conventional and paratransit systems are examined in depth, in terms of the human rights principles that apply, the issues raised, and the impact on older persons, persons with disabilities, and families with young children. Three key issues raised throughout the consultation were funding, standards, and roles and responsibilities. These issues are examined in depth.

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