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  1. Part 1 – Setting the context: understanding race, racism and racial discrimination

    From: Policy and guidelines on racism and racial discrimination

    1. Introduction

    1.1. The Code context

    The Code states that it is public policy in Ontario to recognize the inherent dignity and worth of every person and to provide for equal rights and opportunities without discrimination. The provisions of the Code are aimed at creating a climate of understanding and mutual respect for the dignity and worth of each person, so that each person feels a part of the community and feels able to contribute to the community.

  2. Correction: Toronto Police Service body–worn camera pilot project

    May 27, 2015

    Toronto - Several news outlets have recently quoted a Toronto Police Service (TPS) news release regarding body-worn cameras: http://torontopolice.on.ca/newsreleases/31840

    That release says, in part:

    The Service has partnered with the Information & Privacy Commissioner, the Ontario Human Rights Commission, the Ministry of the Attorney General and the Toronto Police Association to develop a procedure that addresses issues of privacy, retention, and disclosure. 

    This statement is not accurate.

  3. Submission to the Canadian Human Rights Commission concerning section 13 of the Canadian Human Rights Act and the regulation of hate speech on the internet prepared by Richard Moon October 2008

    January 2009 - The OHRC’s comment below focuses on both the legal regulation of hate speech and the role of state and non-state actors. We encourage human rights agencies across Canada, as well as other public and private institutions, to carefully consider both aspects as well in anticipation of further discussion that should occur.

  4. The Ontario Safe Schools Act: School discipline and discrimination

    July 2003 - The main purpose of this report is to examine whether the Ontario Safe Schools Act and Regulations and the school board policies on discipline, known by some as “zero tolerance” policies, are having a disproportionate impact on racial minority students and students with disabilities. Advocates of zero tolerance argue that the policies are colour blind and fair because all the students who commit the same offence will be treated the same. Opponents point to other jurisdictions where there is data showing that suspensions and expulsions have a disproportionate impact on Black and other racial minority students and students with disabilities.
  5. VIII. Discrimination

    From: The Ontario Safe Schools Act: School discipline and discrimination

    Nearly all the interviewees identified discrimination – direct and systemic – as the main reason why the application of discipline in schools has a disproportionate impact on racial minority students and students with disabilities. Some interviewees also pointed out that there are multiple and intersecting grounds of discrimination, including race, disability, poverty and immigrant/refugee status.

    A. General Perceptions

    1. Black Students

    Many Black students who are suspended or expelled believe that it is because of discrimination:

  6. Commission statement concerning issues raised by complaints against Maclean's Magazine

    April 9, 2008

    In a recent decision, the Ontario Human Rights Commission (the “Commission”) decided not to proceed with complaints filed against Maclean’s magazine related to an article “The future belongs to Islam”. The complainants alleged that the content of the magazine and Maclean’s refusal to provide space for a rebuttal violated their human rights.

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