Language selector

Site

Search results

  1. Legal groups, community advocates, academics and Ontario Human Rights Commission call for tougher regulation on "carding"

    December 7, 2015

    A broad network of community advocates, human rights and legal experts, academics, concerned and affected individuals and the Ontario Human Rights Commission (OHRC) is calling on the Province to ensure that its Draft Regulation on police street checks – or “carding” – achieves the Minister’s stated objective of ending arbitrary and discriminatory police street checks. 

  2. Under suspicion: Frequently asked questions

    What is racial profiling?

    Racial profiling is a specific type of racial discrimination that pertains to safety and security. The OHRC currently defines racial profiling as:

    [A]ny action undertaken for reasons of safety, security or public protection that relies on stereotypes about race, colour, ethnicity, ancestry, religion, or place of origin rather than on reasonable suspicion, to single out an individual for greater scrutiny or different treatment.

  3. Opinion Editorial: Political will needed to end carding

    May 23, 2015

    Editor, The Toronto Star

    This week Mark Saunders was sworn in as Chief of the Toronto Police Service. He arrived amid a controversy that marred his predecessor’s final days and one that refuses to go away – the police procedure commonly known as “carding.” As Chief Saunders starts down this new road he has a choice – to hear the voices of the community and work to end racial profiling or to allow a deeply troubling practice to continue.

  4. Under suspicion: Issues raised by Indigenous peoples

    Racial profiling is an insidious and particularly damaging type of racial discrimination that relates to notions of safety and security. Racial profiling violates people’s rights under the Ontario Human Rights Code (Code). People from many different communities experience racial profiling. It is often directed at First Nations, Métis, Inuit and other Indigenous peoples, as well as people in racialized communities. It is often influenced by the distinctly negative stereotypes that people in these communities face.

  5. Public lecture focuses on new ways to stamp out racial profiling

    Tuesday February 16, 2016 - York University’s School of Public Policy & Administration, Institute for Social Research, and Centre for Human Rights and the Ontario Human Rights Commission invite you to attend a public lecture to look at new ways to stamp out racial profiling. Keynote speaker and renowned journalist Haroon Siddiqui will talk about existing and emerging forms of racial profiling, and a panel will offer a variety of perspectives.

  6. Ontario Human Rights Commission Written Deputation to the Toronto Police Services Board re: Policy on Race-Based Data Collection, Analysis and Public Reporting

    September 19, 2019

    The Ontario Human Rights Commission (OHRC) welcomes the opportunity to provide a written deputation to the Toronto Police Services Board (TPSB) on its Policy on Race-Based Data Collection, Analysis and Public Reporting, which is being considered for approval at its September 19, 2019 meeting.

  7. Opening statement: Standing Committee on Canadian Heritage Systemic Racism and Religious Discrimination M-103

    September 20, 2017

    The Government has the power to take action to protect people who are being harmed by racism and Islamophobia, and we call on it to boldly do so. There is considerable scope for the Government to develop positions, policies and programs that promote inclusion and respect, especially for racial and religious minorities. These types of actions are consistent with the values of Canadians and the Charter.

  8. Independent Police Oversight Review: OHRC calls for implementation of recommendations and a renewed commitment to address systemic discrimination

    April 7, 2017

    Toronto – The Ontario Human Rights Commission (OHRC) has long been concerned with systemic discrimination in policing, which is a lived reality for many Ontarians. The result is mistrust that undermines effective policing and ultimately public safety.

Pages