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  1. Commission launches report calling for collective housing strategy

    July 8, 2008

    Toronto - Chief Commissioner Barbara Hall and the Ontario Human Rights Commission today launched “Right at home: Report on the consultation on human rights and rental housing in Ontario.” This report, which follows a year of public sessions, meetings and submissions involving hundreds of individuals and organizations across the province, focuses on housing as a human right, and sets out a framework for collective action to identify, remove and prevent discrimination in rental housing.

  2. Tough talk

    December 10, 2009

    Thunder Bay - Janice Kakegamic said when she and her friends are standing outside Dennis Franklin Cromarty High School it’s not unusual for people to drive by and yell ‘dirty Indians’ or give them the finger.

  3. Celebrating International Women's Day – Ontario Human Rights Commission releases new Policy on preventing sexual and gender-based harassment

    March 8, 2011

    Toronto – A new policy on preventing sexual and gender-based harassment was launched today by the Ontario Human Rights Commission (OHRC) in partnership with the Ryerson Students’ Union, Ryerson University and the CAW-Sam Gindin Chair in Social Justice and Democracy, Ryerson University.

  4. Removing the "Canadian experience" barrier

    Webinar Information

    Removing the "Canadian experience" barrier

    Canadian Experience Webinar

    April 30, 2014 at 11:00 am

    60 minutes

    Policy on removing the “Canadian experience” barrier overview and Q&A.

    English
  5. 2. Purpose of this policy

    From: Policy on preventing discrimination based on mental health disabilities and addictions

    The OHRC’s previous work on disability has addressed discrimination against persons with mental disabilities and/or addictions. The OHRC’s Policy and guidelines on disability and the duty to accommodate (Disability Policy)[16] recognizes that people with mental disabilities face a high degree of stigmatization and significant barriers to employment opportunities.

  6. 7. Intersecting grounds

    From: Policy on preventing discrimination based on mental health disabilities and addictions

    Discrimination may be unique or distinct when it occurs based on two or more Code grounds. Such discrimination can be said to be “intersectional.” The concept of intersectional discrimination recognizes that people’s lives involve multiple interrelated identities, and that marginalization and exclusion based on Code grounds may exist because of how these identities intersect.

  7. 8. Poverty, mental health and addiction

    From: Policy on preventing discrimination based on mental health disabilities and addictions

    People with psychosocial disabilities are more likely to have low incomes than people without psychosocial disabilities, and many people live in chronic poverty. In the OHRC’s mental health consultation, as well as in its housing policy consultation, it heard a great deal about the links between mental health, addictions and societal factors such as poverty, homelessness, lower levels of education, inadequate levels of public assistance and other social supports, and a lack of affordable housing. For example, many people who have psychosocial disabilities receive public assistance.

  8. OHRC submission regarding Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act (AODA) 2013-2014 Legislative review

    June 2014 - The Ontario Human Rights Commission (OHRC) is making this submission to the second independent legislative review of the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act (AODA). In accordance with its mandate under section 29 (c) of the Ontario Human Rights Code, the OHRC speaks out and makes recommendations designed to prevent and eliminate discriminatory practices including barriers faced by persons with disabilities. Disability is consistently the most frequent ground of discrimination cited in over 50% of applications to the Human Rights Tribunal of Ontario.

  9. Human rights obligations related to pregnancy and breastfeeding: Case law review

    October 2014 - This case law review looks at important developments in the law dealing with discrimination based on pregnancy and breastfeeding between 2008 and January 2014.[1] The discussion of the law in Ontario is intended as a resource, to be read along with the Ontario Human Rights Commission’s Policy on Preventing Discrimination because of Pregnancy and Breastfeeding (the Policy)[2], about the rights of women[3] who are pregnant, planning to become pregnant, who have had a baby or who are breastfeeding. However, it is not legal advice.

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