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  1. 'Coming out'

    From: Discussion paper: Toward a commission policy on gender identity

    ‘Coming out’ as a transsexual person connotes a cycle or pattern of acknowledgement that one’s gender identity does not match one’s birth assigned sex. That cycle may begin, for example, with acknowledgement to one’s self and move toward public acknowledgement. However, for many people, this process is not linear. It does not start with denial and end with acknowledgement. It may be a non-linear process where the individual struggles with denial and acknowledgement over a period of time until coming to terms with the true gender self.

  2. 1. Introduction

    From: Policy on preventing sexual and gender-based harassment

    Sexual harassment is a form of discrimination based on sex.[1] The Ontario Human Rights Code (the Code) prohibits all forms of discrimination based on sex, and includes provisions that focus on sexual harassment. The Code offers this protection in five “social” areas: services, goods and facilities; occupancy of accommodation (housing); contracts; employment; and membership in vocational associations such as trade unions.

  3. 1. Introduction

    From: Policy on preventing discrimination because of pregnancy and breastfeeding

    The Ontario Human Rights Code states that it is public policy in Ontario to recognize the inherent dignity and worth of every person and to provide for equal rights and opportunities without discrimination. The Code aims to create a climate of understanding and mutual respect for the dignity and worth of each person, so that each person feels a part of the community and feels able to contribute to the community.

  4. 1. Introduction

    From: Under suspicion: Research and consultation report on racial profiling in Ontario

    …[R]acial profiling occurs and is a day-to-day reality in the lives of those minorities affected by it. 

    …[R]acial profiling cannot be tolerated. It is offensive to fundamental concepts of equality and the human dignity of those who are subject to negative stereotyping. It fuels negative and destructive racial stereotyping of those who are subjected to profiling.

  5. 10. Forms of discrimination

    From: Policy on preventing discrimination based on mental health disabilities and addictions

    Discrimination may take many different forms. For example, it may take place in a direct way. It can happen when individuals or organizations specifically exclude people in rental housing, employment or services, withhold benefits that are available to others, or impose extra burdens that are not imposed on others, without a legitimate or bona fide reason. This discrimination is often based on negative attitudes, stereotypes and bias about people with mental health or addiction disabilities.

  6. 10. Other limits on the duty to accommodate

    From: Policy on preventing discrimination because of gender identity and gender expression

    10.1 Failing to participate in the accommodation process

    Everyone involved in the accommodation process has a duty to cooperate to the best of their ability. In some cases, an organization may have met its procedural and substantive duty to accommodate where the person requesting accommodation did not sufficiently take part in the process, refused or otherwise could not take part at all. While a person may ask for a certain type of accommodation, both sides should be willing to explore options that appropriately meet the person’s needs.

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