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  1. 7. Accommodation policy and procedure

    From: A policy primer: Guide to developing human rights policies and procedures

    A. Description and rationale

    Under the Code, organizations are required to prevent and remove barriers and provide accommodation to the point of undue hardship. The principle of accommodation arises most frequently in the context of creed, family status, sex (pregnancy) and disability, as well as age, gender identity and gender expression.

  2. Policy on competing human rights

    April 2012 - The main goal of this policy is to provide clear, user-friendly guidance to organizations, policy makers, litigants, adjudicators and others on how to assess, handle and resolve competing rights claims. The policy will help various sectors, organizations and individuals deal with everyday situations of competing rights, and avoid the time and expense of bringing a legal challenge before a court or human rights decision-maker. It sets out a process, based in existing case law, to analyze and reconcile competing rights. This process is flexible and can apply to any competing rights claim under the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms, provincial or federal human rights legislation or another legislative scheme.

  3. Appendix D: Case examples for resolving competing rights

    From: Policy on competing human rights

    Scenario 1: The Prom

    Recognizing rights

    1. What are the claims about?

    Matt’s Claim

    Matt is a gay 17-year-old student attending a publicly funded Catholic high school. He wishes to go to the prom with a same-sex date. The prom is being held at a rental hall off school property. He is considering seeking a court injunction because the prom is only weeks away.

  4. Confidentiality and disclosure of information

    From: Guidelines on accessible education

    When requesting accommodation from an education provider, students (and/or their parent(s)/guardian(s)) have a responsibility to provide sufficient information about their disability-related needs to facilitate the accommodation. Educational services at the lower levels of education are broad and may include cultivating aspects of the student’s development beyond those that are strictly academic.

  5. Part 3 – guidelines for implementation: monitoring and combating racism and racial discrimination

    From: Policy and guidelines on racism and racial discrimination

    6. Collection and analysis of numerical data

    It is a common misperception that the Code prohibits the collection and analysis of data identifying people based on race and other Code grounds. Many individuals, organizations and institutions mistakenly believe that collecting this data is automatically antithetical to human rights.

  6. Count me in! Collecting human rights-based data

    2010 - This guide is intended to be a practical resource for human resources professionals, human rights and equity advisors, managers and supervisors, unions, and any other people or groups considering a data collection project, or seeking support to do so. This guide may be particularly helpful to readers with little or no knowledge of data collection. The guide will discuss the benefits of data collection, and will highlight key concepts and practical considerations for organizations thinking of gathering data on Code and non-Code grounds. Appendices A to F offer concrete examples of how non-profit, private and public-sector organizations have successfully developed and implemented data collection projects.
  7. Human rights policy in Ontario - 2008 edition

    December 7, 2007

    On this 45th anniversary of the Ontario Human Rights Code, I am pleased to present the fourth edition of Human Rights Policy in Ontario, a publication first introduced in 1998. I am also pleased that Carswell, a respected publisher of employment and human rights related material, is our partner in putting together this latest compendium of the Ontario Human Rights Commission’s policies and guidelines.