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  1. Annual report 2008-2009

    June 2009 - This past year we celebrated the 60th anniversary of the United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights. As we did, I thought about how recent the concept of human rights really is, and how, over 60 years, it has changed to include more and more people in our communities. People with disabilities, members of the LGBT communities, newcomers from across the globe – are just some of the people who have worked hard to see themselves reflected accurately and equitably in our society. That work has resulted in great advances; much has been achieved in just 60 years.
  2. Commission activities 2006-2007: Promoting, protecting and advancing human rights

    From: Annual report 2006-2007

    Public Contact with the Commission

    As the first point of contact for members of the public, the Commission’s inquiry service delivers important public education about human rights and responsibilities under the Code, and provides information about the Commission’s policies and guidelines, as well as relevant external resources. The Commission is often able to assist individuals and organizations to prevent or resolve problems so that a complaint is not necessary.

    In 2006-07:

  3. Connecting with communities: partnership and education

    From: Annual report 2007-2008

    Marketing awareness with Seneca College

    One of the challenges of transforming Ontario’s human rights system is to let Ontarians know about the changes. The Commission turned to the artists of tomorrow to help create a new vision of the changing system. For the third year in a row, the Commission teamed up with students and faculty from Seneca College’s graphic design program at York University to develop human rights awareness campaigns. This year’s goal was to develop concepts that would effectively communicate the transformation of the human rights system.

  4. Realizing rights in rental housing

    From: Annual report 2008-2009

    In July 2008, the OHRC released Right at Home: Report on the consultation on human rights and rental housing in Ontario. This report followed a year of public sessions, meetings and submissions involving hundreds of individuals, organizations and landlords across the province. It focuses on housing as a human right, and sets out a framework for collective action to identify, remove and prevent discrimination in rental housing.

  5. OHRC, business and community say "yes"; to collecting human rights-based data

    From: Annual report 2009-2010 Educate Empower Act

    It is hard to solve problems or run a successful business or make a good policy without all of the information. Yet this happens regularly when it comes to race, disability, sex, gender identity and other grounds covered by the Code. In many cases, information is not collected because of fear that doing so would itself be contravening the Code. That’s why the OHRC published a new guide called Count me in!, which dispels the myths and fears about collecting human rights-based data.

  6. Saying no to racial profiling

    From: Annual report 2009-2010 Educate Empower Act

    The OHRC’s work on racism and racial profiling has been a driving force in its partnership with the Toronto Police Services Board on the Toronto Police Charter Project.

    The OHRC also intervened at the Tribunal in a complaint by Ron Phipps – a case which raised some tough issues. The Tribunal ruled Phipps had been subjected to racial profiling in 2005 by a Toronto police officer. The officer stopped Phipps when he was delivering mail in an affluent Toronto neighbourhood, checked with a homeowner Phipps spoke to, trailed him and checked his identity with a White letter carrier.

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