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  1. OHRC Submission to the Independent Review of Police Oversight Bodies

    November 2016 - For nearly two decades, the Ontario Human Rights Commission (OHRC) has raised concerns about systemic discrimination that are part of the culture of policing in our province. There have been far too many instances of racial profiling, discriminatory use of force on people with mental health disabilities and/or addictions, and racism and sexism in investigations of missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls in Ontario to ignore. These incidents and related concerns have sparked multiple coroner’s inquests, recommendations, reviews and reports, stretching back for decades. Yet they all have failed to eliminate systemic discrimination in policing.

  2. Eliminating discrimination to advance the human rights of women and transgender people

    From: OHRC policy position on sexualized and gender-specific dress codes

    March 8, 2016 - Through its public education, policy development, outreach and litigation functions, the Ontario Human Rights Commission (OHRC) continues to work with community partners to challenge gender inequality and promote and advance the human rights of women and trans people in Ontario. Here is some of the work the OHRC has done in the past year:  

  3. 1. Introduction

    From: Policy on preventing discrimination because of pregnancy and breastfeeding

    The Ontario Human Rights Code states that it is public policy in Ontario to recognize the inherent dignity and worth of every person and to provide for equal rights and opportunities without discrimination. The Code aims to create a climate of understanding and mutual respect for the dignity and worth of each person, so that each person feels a part of the community and feels able to contribute to the community.

  4. Methodology

    From: Discussion paper: Toward a commission policy on gender identity

    The methodology for this discussion paper included:

    • consultation with members and representatives of the transgendered community,
    • review of jurisprudence and legislation in Canada and in other jurisdictions,
    • literature review, and
    • review of other human rights commission policies.

    Although the reviews of literature and case law were not exhaustive, the intention was to identify significant trends and developments related to the issue of gender identity.