Language selector

Site

Search results

  1. 7. Forms of discrimination

    From: Policy on preventing discrimination because of gender identity and gender expression

    7.1 Direct, indirect and subtle discrimination

    Discrimination may take many different forms. It may happen in a direct way. It can happen when individuals or organizations exclude trans people from housing, employment or services, withhold benefits that are available to others, or impose extra burdens that are not imposed on others, without a legitimate reason.

    Discrimination may also happen indirectly. It may be carried out through another person or organization.

  2. Preventing sexual harassment at work: An overview

    Webinar Information

    Preventing sexual harassment at work: An overview

    Sexual harassment at work

    December 10, 2014 at 11:00 am

    40 minutes

    Overview on preventing sexual harassment at work, with Q&A.

    English
  3. Appendix B: Policy position

    From: Not on the menu: OHRC inquiry report on sexualized and gender-based dress codes in restaurants

    OHRC policy position on sexualized and gender-specific dress codes

    Some Ontario employers require female employees to dress in a sexualized or gender-specific way at work, such as expecting women to wear high heels, short skirts, tight clothing or low-cut tops. These kinds of dress codes reinforce stereotypical and sexist notions about how women should look and may violate Ontario’s Human Rights Code.

  4. Appendix 2

    From: Discussion paper: Toward a commission policy on gender identity

    Glossary of Gender

    This glossary was compiled by Transgender Nation (San Francisco, California). The organization is a diverse group of transgendered and non-transgendered people united “in anger” and resolved to directly empower all transgendered people by direct political action.

    assigned gender at birth - the gender one is considered to be at birth, due to the presence of whatever external sex organs. Once this determination is made, it becomes a label used for raising the child in either one gender image or the other.

  5. OHRC submission regarding MGS Consultation: Change of sex designation on a birth registration of a minor

    The Ontario Human Rights Commission (OHRC) welcomes the Ministry of Government Services’ consultation regarding change of sex designation on a birth registration of a minor. The OHRC is concerned that the current government practice – which does not allow for a change of sex designation on the birth registration and certificate of persons under age 18 – is discriminatory on the basis of gender identity and gender expression.

  6. Hockey Canada’s Ontario branches take important step towards transgender inclusion

    September 7, 2016

    Toronto — Hockey Canada, through its Ontario branches, ushers in a new era of transgender inclusion in time for the 2016-2017 hockey season by posting transgender inclusive policies. This step is part of a settlement agreement between Hockey Canada, on behalf of its Ontario members, the Ontario Human Rights Commission (OHRC) and Jesse Thompson, a trans teenaged boy who played amateur hockey and courageously decided to take on the system.

Pages