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  1. Part II - The policy framework

    From: Policy on discrimination and harassment because of sexual orientation

    4. Discrimination based on sexual orientation

    The Code provides that every person has the right to be treated equally without discrimination because of sexual orientation. The purpose of anti-discrimination laws is to prevent the violation of human dignity and freedom through the imposition of disadvantage, stereotyping or political or social prejudice.

  2. Ageism

    From: Time for action: Advancing human rights for older Ontarians

    During the consultation, the Commission heard repeatedly about ageism and its effects. Ageism can give rise to individual acts of discrimination, but can also have an impact on a wider scale by influencing policies, programs and legislation that affect broad sectors of society. For the purposes of this Report, the term ‘ageism’ refers to two types of behaviour that have a negative effect on older persons. The first involves the social construction of age, including incorrect assumptions and stereotypes about older persons.

  3. Age & intersectionality

    From: Time for action: Advancing human rights for older Ontarians

    The Commission recognizes that persons may experience disadvantage in unique ways based on the intersection of age with other aspects of their identity. During the consultations, the Commission heard about certain groups of older persons who face particular barriers arising from the intersection of age with gender, disability, sexual orientation, race, ethnicity, religion, culture and language.

    “Women particularly suffer because of past customs, practices and traditions.” (Canadian Pensioners Concerned)

  4. Employment

    From: Time for action: Advancing human rights for older Ontarians

    Employment is fundamental to ensuring equal participation and equal opportunity in society. It has a direct bearing on a person’s economic status while the person is in the workforce and afterwards. Therefore, any examination of age discrimination in employment must consider the effects of practices and policies on the person while they are working as well as after they have retired. It must also consider the effect on society as a whole.

  5. Conclusion

    From: Time for action: Advancing human rights for older Ontarians

    The content of this report confirms that the current approach to human rights issues facing older persons in Ontario is unsustainable. Older persons in this province continue to face a wide variety of barriers that pose a serious affront to their human dignity and to their independence, security, full participation, and fairness. The issues identified in this Report raise significant human rights concerns to which the Commission and broader society must respond.

  6. Appendix A: Summary of recommendations for government & community action

    From: Time for action: Advancing human rights for older Ontarians

    1. THAT the five principles contained in the National Framework on Aging be integrated in policies and programs of public and private sector organizations.
    2. THAT all levels of government evaluate laws, policies and programs to ensure that they do not contain age-based assumptions and stereotypes and that they reflect the needs of older persons.

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