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  1. 4. Systemic faithism

    From: Human rights and creed research and consultation report

    Systemic faithism refers to the ways that cultural and societal norms, systems, structures and institutions directly or indirectly, consciously or unwittingly,[128] promote, sustain or entrench differential (dis)advantage for individuals and groups based on their faith (understood broadly to include religious and non-religious belief systems). Systemic faithism can adversely affect both religious and non-religious persons, depending on the context, as discussed in the examples below.

  2. 4. The OHRC’s 2008-2012 priorities, initiatives and impacts

    From: Ontario Human Rights Commission Submission regarding Section 57 three-year statutory review of the Ontario Human Rights System

    In November 2008, following public town hall meetings with individuals and groups across the province, the OHRC finalized strategic and business plans to guide its work under its new mandate for the following three years. Our aim is to educate, empower and mobilize partners in communities across the province to raise awareness, help identify concerns and implement solutions.

  3. 4. What are competing rights?

    From: Policy on competing human rights

    In general, competing human rights involve situations where parties to a dispute claim that the enjoyment of an individual or group’s human rights and freedoms, as protected by law, would interfere with another’s rights and freedoms. This complicates the normal approach to resolving a human rights dispute where only one side claims a human rights violation. In some cases, only one party is making a human rights claim, but the claim conflicts with the legal entitlements of another party or parties.

  4. 5. Collecting data in a Code-consistent way

    From: Count me in! Collecting human rights-based data

    Collecting information about characteristics based on Code and non-Code grounds may lead to fears that the information might be used to treat a person or group in a discriminatory way, give unmerited preference to a particular group that does face historical discrimination, or lead to individuals being identified or “outed.” To address such fears, the following guidelines are strongly recommended to make sure that data involving Code and non-Code grounds is collected and used in a legitimate and appropriate way:

  5. 5. Context for the report findings

    From: OHRC Response to the Race Data and Traffic Stops in Ottawa Report

    The results from the OPS data collection project are situated within a context of historical police/community relations with racialized and Indigenous peoples in Ottawa and Canada generally. Many Supreme Court of Canada decisions and research studies show that systemic discrimination in policing is a reality. The York University researchers’ findings are similar to the results of other research conducted on police bias.

  6. 5. Emerging human rights protections

    From: Policy on preventing discrimination because of gender identity and gender expression

    5.1 Ontario

    In 1999, the OHRC took the position that the ground of sex under human rights law could be interpreted to include the right of transgender people to be free from discrimination and harassment.

    In 2000, the OHRC released its ground breaking Policy on discrimination and harassment because of gender identity (the original version of this policy). The OHRC and others successfully litigated that policy over the years, with tribunals and courts recognizing more and more the human rights of trans people.

  7. 5. Employment

    From: Policy on discrimination against older people because of age

    Assumptions and stereotypes about older workers are unfortunately all too prevalent in our workplaces. Older workers are often unfairly perceived as less productive, less committed to their jobs, not dynamic or innovative, unreceptive to change, unable to be trained or costly to the organization due to health problems and higher salaries. These ideas about older workers are simply myths that are not borne out by evidence. In fact, there is significant evidence that older workers:

  8. 5. Interviewing and making hiring decisions

    From: Human Rights at Work 2008 - Third Edition

    This section describes the human rights issues that commonly arise in interviews, some of the types of questions that may or may not be asked, and how to make hiring decisions that do not contravene the Code. Supervisors, managers and human resources staff who are responsible for making hiring decisions must be trained and educated to identify and eliminate discrimination, harassment and barriers to advancement for persons protected by the Code.

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