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  1. 5. Context for the report findings

    From: OHRC Response to the Race Data and Traffic Stops in Ottawa Report

    The results from the OPS data collection project are situated within a context of historical police/community relations with racialized and Indigenous peoples in Ottawa and Canada generally. Many Supreme Court of Canada decisions and research studies show that systemic discrimination in policing is a reality. The York University researchers’ findings are similar to the results of other research conducted on police bias.

  2. 1. Introduction

    From: Under suspicion: Research and consultation report on racial profiling in Ontario

    …[R]acial profiling occurs and is a day-to-day reality in the lives of those minorities affected by it. 

    …[R]acial profiling cannot be tolerated. It is offensive to fundamental concepts of equality and the human dignity of those who are subject to negative stereotyping. It fuels negative and destructive racial stereotyping of those who are subjected to profiling.

  3. Case summaries

    From: Discussion paper: Human rights issues in insurance

    (Extracts from CHRR)

    Discriminatory auto insurance rates allowed for bona fide reasons

    Zurich Insurance Co. v. Ontario (Human Rights Comm.)

    The majority of the Supreme Court of Canada finds that Zurich Insurance did not discriminate against Michael Bates contrary to the Ontario Human Rights Code by charging him higher premiums for automobile insurance because of his age, sex, and marital status.

  4. 5. Employment

    From: Policy on discrimination against older people because of age

    Assumptions and stereotypes about older workers are unfortunately all too prevalent in our workplaces. Older workers are often unfairly perceived as less productive, less committed to their jobs, not dynamic or innovative, unreceptive to change, unable to be trained or costly to the organization due to health problems and higher salaries. These ideas about older workers are simply myths that are not borne out by evidence. In fact, there is significant evidence that older workers:

  5. Compliance and promotion through the Human Rights Commission

    From: From research to legislation: Challenging public perceptions and getting results

    Human rights commissions, established in almost all jurisdictions in Canada, typically have broad mandates to enforce and promote human rights. The purpose of promotion activity is to inform and educate in order to create awareness and impart knowledge of human rights. Protection of rights depends on people knowing about the rights they have and available mechanisms to enforce them, as well as knowing and accepting their obligations to uphold those rights.

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