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  1. Compliance and promotion through the Human Rights Commission

    From: From research to legislation: Challenging public perceptions and getting results

    Human rights commissions, established in almost all jurisdictions in Canada, typically have broad mandates to enforce and promote human rights. The purpose of promotion activity is to inform and educate in order to create awareness and impart knowledge of human rights. Protection of rights depends on people knowing about the rights they have and available mechanisms to enforce them, as well as knowing and accepting their obligations to uphold those rights.

  2. VI. The Duty to Accommodate

    From: Policy and guidelines on discrimination because of family status

    The duty to accommodate will only arise where a prima facie case of discrimination on the basis of family status has been demonstrated, as discussed above. Generally, the duty to accommodate will only become an issue in cases where rules, policies, practices, or institutional structures, assumptions or culture are perpetuating or leading to the disadvantage of persons identified by a particular family status.

  3. Ageism

    From: Time for action: Advancing human rights for older Ontarians

    During the consultation, the Commission heard repeatedly about ageism and its effects. Ageism can give rise to individual acts of discrimination, but can also have an impact on a wider scale by influencing policies, programs and legislation that affect broad sectors of society. For the purposes of this Report, the term ‘ageism’ refers to two types of behaviour that have a negative effect on older persons. The first involves the social construction of age, including incorrect assumptions and stereotypes about older persons.

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