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  1. 11. Managing performance and discipline

    From: Human Rights at Work 2008 - Third Edition

    The Commission recognizes the right of the employer to manage its workforce, including relying on discipline when necessary. A progressive performance management approach that takes into account accommodation needs, and is consistently applied and documented, is a best practice.

    a) Evaluating and managing performance

    It is in an organization’s best interest to follow good human resources practices, such as regular performance appraisals and documented progressive performance management of all employees.

  2. Commission releases revised policies

    December 22, 2000

    Toronto - The Ontario Human Rights Commission today released two revised policies. The Commission's Policy on Drug and Alcohol Testing has been updated to reflect the Ontario Court of Appeal's recent decision in Entrop v. Imperial Oil Ltd., a human rights complaint involving the introduction of a workplace policy requiring employees in safety-sensitive positions to disclose a past or current substance abuse problem. In this case, although the problem had occurred eight years earlier and there had been no further incident of substance abuse, the employee was immediately reassigned to another position. The employee subsequently filed a human rights complaint alleging discrimination because of a handicap.

  3. 7. Pay, benefits, dress codes and other issues

    From: Human Rights at Work 2008 - Third Edition

    a) Human rights training and education for employees

    As is noted in Section IV-1a(v) – “Educate and train employees on policies and procedures,” it is expected that all employees will receive human rights training so that they can know and understand their obligations in the workplace. It is very important that this be done for employees providing services to the public and senior staff responsible for hiring, managing performance, accommodations, discipline and handling human rights concerns. Failing to train these key staff may lead to human rights claims.

  4. Social condition – an option for human rights commissions

    From: Human rights commissions and economic and social rights

    The Concept of “Social Condition”

    The addition of “social condition” to human rights legislation has been proposed as one option for addressing economic inequality in Canada.[156] As well, it is a possible response to the ICESCR Committee’s recommendation that social and economic rights be expressly incorporated into federal and provincial human rights legislation.

  5. IX. Employment

    From: Policy and guidelines on discrimination because of family status

    To a significant degree, the workplace is still built on the assumption that families are composed in a ‘traditional’ fashion, of two married heterosexual parents, one of whom is providing full-time caregiving for children, aging relatives, and other family members as necessary. Work schedules, policies and benefits all too often reflect the assumption that employees do not have substantial caregiving obligations. The corollary to this assumption is the belief that workers who do have substantial caregiving obligations are in some way inferior and undesirable employees.

  6. The need for greater protection of religious associational rights in employment

    From: Creed, freedom of religion and human rights - Special issue of Diversity Magazine - Volume 9:3 Summer 2012

    The exemption from the prohibition of employment discrimination (section 24(1)(a) of the Human Rights Code) is a concern for religious communities; narrow interpretation results in undue infringement of the right to freely associate with others in a religious community.

  7. The relationship between religions and a secular society

    From: Creed, freedom of religion and human rights - Special issue of Diversity Magazine - Volume 9:3 Summer 2012

    The first step in developing a framework for the interface between a secular society and religion is to define the role of the “secular” state. This paper identifies four interpretations of the meaning of “secular” and identifies legal cases that use several different interpretations.

  8. Appendix F- DiverseCity Counts

    From: Count me in! Collecting human rights-based data

    DiverseCity Counts, a three-year research project, is tracking the diversity in leadership across the corporate, public, not-for-profit and education sectors in the Greater Toronto Area (GTA). The resulting report, DiverseCity Counts: A Snapshot of Diversity in the Greater Toronto Area, is the first research effort offering a benchmark of the representation of the GTA’s visible minorities in senior leadership roles across sectors.

  9. Appendix A

    From: Fishing without fear: Report on the inquiry into assaults on Asian Canadian anglers

    The Hate Crimes Community Working Group Report and Initiatives in Schools

    The Hate Crimes Community Working Group Report

    The Hate Crimes Community Working Group defines hate activity as:

    Hate incidents: expressions of bias, prejudice and bigotry that are carried out by individuals, groups, organizations and states, directed against stigmatized and marginalized groups in communities, and intended to affirm and secure existing structures of domination and subordination.

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