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  1. Auto insurance

    From: Consultation report: Human rights issues in insurance

    The Insurance Bureau of Canada (IBC) affirms that it represents 90 per cent of the auto insurance industry in Ontario. IBC provides a Consumer Information Centre service and has a mandate to coordinate industry views and present them at consultations such as the one conducted by the Commission. Data studies are also carried out to analyze what variables most effectively predict driver risk.

  2. Public consultation paper: Human rights and mental health strategy

    November 2009 - The OHRC is developing a human rights mental health strategy to guide its activity in addressing systemic areas of discrimination affecting people with mental health disabilities. In September 2009, the OHRC started meeting with individuals and organizations in the field regarding human rights concerns faced by people with mental health disabilities. This second stage of consultation is aimed at soliciting your views to identify key approaches, issues and projects in these areas.
  3. Appendix A - Mount Sinai Hospital

    From: Count me in! Collecting human rights-based data

    Mount Sinai Hospital (MSH) is a large patient care, teaching and research hospital affiliated with the University of Toronto. Since 2007, Media Corp Inc. has named MSH one of Greater Toronto’s Top Employers. MSH seeks to be a national leader in all of its diversity and human rights programs, and to have a staff team that reflects the diverse patients they serve.

  4. What is racial profiling?

    From: Paying the price: The human cost of racial profiling

    While many of the existing definitions of racial profiling, primarily originating in the United States, focus on law enforcement, the Ontario Human Rights Commission’s Terms of Reference define racial profiling more broadly to include any action undertaken for reasons of safety, security or public protection that relies on stereotypes about race, colour, ethnicity, ancestry, religion, or place of origin rather than on reasonable suspicion, to single out an individual for greater scrutiny or different treatment.

  5. Legal services branch

    From: Annual report 2002-2003

    During the 2002-2003 fiscal year, the Legal Services Branch was involved in the following resolutions: 13 Human Rights Tribunal of Ontario decisions, 37 settlements, 5 judicial review decisions, 4 appeal decisions, and one Supreme Court of Canada decision.

    At the end of the fiscal year, the ongoing litigation in the Legal Services Branch comprised: 80 Human Rights Tribunal of Ontario files, 14 judicial reviews, 5 appeals, and one case at the Supreme Court of Canada. 

  6. Commission releases revised policies

    December 22, 2000

    Toronto - The Ontario Human Rights Commission today released two revised policies. The Commission's Policy on Drug and Alcohol Testing has been updated to reflect the Ontario Court of Appeal's recent decision in Entrop v. Imperial Oil Ltd., a human rights complaint involving the introduction of a workplace policy requiring employees in safety-sensitive positions to disclose a past or current substance abuse problem. In this case, although the problem had occurred eight years earlier and there had been no further incident of substance abuse, the employee was immediately reassigned to another position. The employee subsequently filed a human rights complaint alleging discrimination because of a handicap.

  7. Part 3 – guidelines for implementation: monitoring and combating racism and racial discrimination

    From: Policy and guidelines on racism and racial discrimination

    6. Collection and analysis of numerical data

    It is a common misperception that the Code prohibits the collection and analysis of data identifying people based on race and other Code grounds. Many individuals, organizations and institutions mistakenly believe that collecting this data is automatically antithetical to human rights.

  8. Social condition – an option for human rights commissions

    From: Human rights commissions and economic and social rights

    The Concept of “Social Condition”

    The addition of “social condition” to human rights legislation has been proposed as one option for addressing economic inequality in Canada.[156] As well, it is a possible response to the ICESCR Committee’s recommendation that social and economic rights be expressly incorporated into federal and provincial human rights legislation.

  9. IX. Employment

    From: Policy and guidelines on discrimination because of family status

    To a significant degree, the workplace is still built on the assumption that families are composed in a ‘traditional’ fashion, of two married heterosexual parents, one of whom is providing full-time caregiving for children, aging relatives, and other family members as necessary. Work schedules, policies and benefits all too often reflect the assumption that employees do not have substantial caregiving obligations. The corollary to this assumption is the belief that workers who do have substantial caregiving obligations are in some way inferior and undesirable employees.