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  1. 4. Creed

    From: Policy on preventing discrimination based on creed

    Policy framework

    Creed is a prohibited ground of discrimination under the Ontario Human Rights Code. The fact that Ontario adopted the term creed (or "la croyance" in French) in its human rights legislation, and not another term (such as religion, religious belief or religious creed as used in other Canadian human rights statutes), is significant when interpreting its meaning. It suggests that creed may have a meaning that is distinct from these other closely related terms.[65]  

  2. Social condition – an option for human rights commissions

    From: Human rights commissions and economic and social rights

    The Concept of “Social Condition”

    The addition of “social condition” to human rights legislation has been proposed as one option for addressing economic inequality in Canada.[156] As well, it is a possible response to the ICESCR Committee’s recommendation that social and economic rights be expressly incorporated into federal and provincial human rights legislation.

  3. IX. Employment

    From: Policy and guidelines on discrimination because of family status

    To a significant degree, the workplace is still built on the assumption that families are composed in a ‘traditional’ fashion, of two married heterosexual parents, one of whom is providing full-time caregiving for children, aging relatives, and other family members as necessary. Work schedules, policies and benefits all too often reflect the assumption that employees do not have substantial caregiving obligations. The corollary to this assumption is the belief that workers who do have substantial caregiving obligations are in some way inferior and undesirable employees.

  4. Faith in the public school system: Principles for reconciliation

    From: Creed, freedom of religion and human rights - Special issue of Diversity Magazine - Volume 9:3 Summer 2012

    Freedom of religion includes both the right to manifest beliefs and practices and the right to be free from state coercion or constraint in matters of religion. This paper looks at the scope and interaction of these two aspects of freedom of religion in the context of religious accommodation issues in public schools.

  5. Appendix A

    From: Fishing without fear: Report on the inquiry into assaults on Asian Canadian anglers

    The Hate Crimes Community Working Group Report and Initiatives in Schools

    The Hate Crimes Community Working Group Report

    The Hate Crimes Community Working Group defines hate activity as:

    Hate incidents: expressions of bias, prejudice and bigotry that are carried out by individuals, groups, organizations and states, directed against stigmatized and marginalized groups in communities, and intended to affirm and secure existing structures of domination and subordination.

  6. Appendix F- DiverseCity Counts

    From: Count me in! Collecting human rights-based data

    DiverseCity Counts, a three-year research project, is tracking the diversity in leadership across the corporate, public, not-for-profit and education sectors in the Greater Toronto Area (GTA). The resulting report, DiverseCity Counts: A Snapshot of Diversity in the Greater Toronto Area, is the first research effort offering a benchmark of the representation of the GTA’s visible minorities in senior leadership roles across sectors.

  7. Analysis and conclusions

    From: Discussion paper: Discrimination and age - Human rights issues facing older persons in Ontario

    General

    Age cases tend to be treated differently than other discrimination cases, particularly where the case involves retirement issues. The most noticeable difference from a human rights perspective is the lack of a sense of moral opprobrium linked to age discrimination which, in comparable circumstances would generate outrage if the ground of discrimination were, say, race, sex or disability.

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