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  1. Removing the "Canadian experience" barrier

    Webinar Information

    Removing the "Canadian experience" barrier

    Canadian Experience Webinar

    April 30, 2014 at 11:00 am

    60 minutes

    Policy on removing the “Canadian experience” barrier overview and Q&A.

    English
  2. Sexualized and gender-based dress codes may discriminate

    From: Not on the menu: OHRC inquiry report on sexualized and gender-based dress codes in restaurants

    Employers can have dress codes, but only if they do not violate the CodeHuman rights decisions dating back to the 1980s have found that dress codes that create adverse impacts based on sex violate human rights laws. Any sex-based requirements in the dress code must be legitimately linked to the requirements of the job, or they will be discriminatory.[11]

  3. The OHRC’s initiative on sexualized and gender-based dress codes

    From: Not on the menu: OHRC inquiry report on sexualized and gender-based dress codes in restaurants

    Under the Code, the OHRC works to identify, prevent and eliminate discrimination, and promote and advance human rights across the province. Our goal is to create an inclusive society where everyone is valued, treated with equal dignity and respect, and takes responsibility and action, so human rights are a lived reality. 

  4. Appendix C: Sample gender-neutral dress code policy

    From: Not on the menu: OHRC inquiry report on sexualized and gender-based dress codes in restaurants

    These are examples of gender-neutral dress code descriptions based on dress codes already in use in Ontario restaurants, including a wide range of styles and degrees of formality. Note: all positions should include a pants option.

    Below each option they may wish to include, companies can set out guidelines, such as colour, source, style, fabric type and/or pattern, and how the item is to be worn (such as options to roll sleeve or pant cuffs, limitations on skirt or shorts length, any seasonal limitations on wearing the item, etc.).

  5. Policy and education branch - promotion and awareness of human rights

    From: Annual report 2000–2001

    Policy Development 

    In keeping with its mandate to promote greater understanding of human rights and encourage research to eliminate discriminatory practices, the Commission undertook a number of policy development initiatives in 2000-2001.

    The Commission held public meetings and issued discussion papers to the public and media on emerging human rights policy areas. New policies were introduced and several policies were updated.  The Commission also embarked on a major public education campaign.

  6. III. Family status and other Code grounds

    From: The cost of caring: Report on the consultation on discrimination on the basis of family status

    Each individual’s experience of his or her family status is profoundly influenced by other aspects of their identify, such as gender, sexual orientation, age, race, marital status, or disability: this was a major theme of the submissions the Commission received. For example, the experience of an aging parent of a child with a disability will differ from that of an Aboriginal single mother in search of housing. A heterosexual married mother seeking career advancement will experience different barriers than a lesbian couple dealing with their children’s schooling.

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