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  1. Appendix B: Policy development process

    From: Policy on competing human rights

    Over the past several years, the OHRC has taken many steps to advance understanding of how best to address competing rights. In 2005, the OHRC began the dialogue by releasing a research paper entitled, Balancing Conflicting Rights: Towards an Analytical Framework.[97] The paper provided the public with preliminary information that would promote discussion and further research without taking any firm policy positions.

  2. Human rights policy in Ontario - 2008 edition

    December 7, 2007

    On this 45th anniversary of the Ontario Human Rights Code, I am pleased to present the fourth edition of Human Rights Policy in Ontario, a publication first introduced in 1998. I am also pleased that Carswell, a respected publisher of employment and human rights related material, is our partner in putting together this latest compendium of the Ontario Human Rights Commission’s policies and guidelines.

  3. Appendix A: Summary of recommendations for government & community action

    From: Time for action: Advancing human rights for older Ontarians

    1. THAT the five principles contained in the National Framework on Aging be integrated in policies and programs of public and private sector organizations.
    2. THAT all levels of government evaluate laws, policies and programs to ensure that they do not contain age-based assumptions and stereotypes and that they reflect the needs of older persons.
  4. 9.5. Intersections with race and related grounds

    From: Minds that matter: Report on the consultation on human rights, mental health and addictions

    We heard about the different types of intersecting discrimination occurring because of race, citizenship, ethnic origin, place of origin, ancestry, colour or creed, in addition to mental health disabilities and/or addictions. We were told how perceptions about people’s disabilities can contribute to negative perceptions based on race in different ways.

  5. Comment of the Ontario Human Rights Commission on Every Door is the Right Door: Towards a 10-Year Mental Health and Addictions Strategy - Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care

    August 2009 - The Ontario Human Rights Commission, (the “Commission”) commends the Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care (“Ministry”) for its work on an improved strategy to meet the needs of Ontarians with mental illnesses and addictions. The Commission is pleased to provide its input on this discussion paper, particularly with respect to the sections on Stigma and Healthy Communities.
  6. Analysis and conclusions

    From: Discussion paper: Discrimination and age - Human rights issues facing older persons in Ontario

    General

    Age cases tend to be treated differently than other discrimination cases, particularly where the case involves retirement issues. The most noticeable difference from a human rights perspective is the lack of a sense of moral opprobrium linked to age discrimination which, in comparable circumstances would generate outrage if the ground of discrimination were, say, race, sex or disability.

  7. My life as a woman in Canada

    By Dr. Barbara Landau

    Women in Canada have only recently come close to equal treatment. We were not allowed to vote until WW1 (1914-18) and Quebec only granted women the vote in 1940. Even with the vote, women did not have rights separate from their husbands. Until 1929, women were not considered “persons” under our Constitution for the purpose of serving in the Senate.

    I will share a sample of my experiences that hopefully young women today will find unthinkable.

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