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  1. Alternative voting methods – an OHRC letter to Elections Ontario

    December 4, 2012

    Dear Mr. Essensa, Thank you for the opportunity to meet earlier this month regarding Elections Ontario’s review and public consultation on alternative voting methods involving internet and telephone voting technologies. The Ontario Human Rights Commission supports these forms of accessible voting as well as the eight electoral principles identified by Elections Ontario.

  2. The missing link: Tolerance, accommodation and... equality

    From: Creed, freedom of religion and human rights - Special issue of Diversity Magazine - Volume 9:3 Summer 2012

    This paper encourages a rethinking of the ideas of tolerance and accommodation, suggesting that these concepts may be inappropriate for a country that has a history of diversity, multiculturalism and equality. The paper considers the contexts in which the language of tolerance and accommodation is located.

  3. Two errors in relation to respecting religious rights: Driving a wedge between religion and ethics/morals and treating all kinds of religious employers the same

    From: Creed, freedom of religion and human rights - Special issue of Diversity Magazine - Volume 9:3 Summer 2012

    This article argues that “creed” and religion should be understood as something that informs what a person takes into the public and that necessarily includes beliefs that may (and often do) influence “morals and ethics” and even “politics.”

  4. Inducing Fundamentalisms: Law as a cultural force in the domain of religion

    From: Creed, freedom of religion and human rights - Special issue of Diversity Magazine - Volume 9:3 Summer 2012

    This essay explores the possibility that the way that the constitutional rule of law imagines and analyses religion influences how religious groups present and, perhaps ultimately, understand their own beliefs, practices, and traditions.

  5. Accommodation and compromise: Why freedom of religion issues cannot be resolved through balancing

    From: Creed, freedom of religion and human rights - Special issue of Diversity Magazine - Volume 9:3 Summer 2012

    Chief Justice McLachlin has said that while “reasonable accommodation” may be the appropriate “analysis” in private sector freedom of religion/religious discrimination cases, it is not appropriate in Charter cases in which the restriction on religious freedom is imposed by statute. I think the Chief Justice is right that there are important differences between these two kinds of restriction on religious practices – private sector/human rights code and legislative/Charter. I will argue, though, that her alternative approach, the balancing of interests under s.1 Charter, is either inappropriate or unworkable.

  6. Commission-initiated advice, inquiry and complaints

    From: Annual report 2005-2006

    The Commission favours a voluntary and cooperative approach to protecting and promoting human rights and resolving complaints.  The Commission uses its broad mandate under section 29 of the Code to provide advice to organizations, review legislation for compliance with the Code, and inquire into situations that may have a negative impact relating to a Code ground.

  7. Creed case law review

    May 2012 - What follows is a discussion of significant legal decisions dealing with religious and creed rights in Canada. The focus is on decisions made since the Commission issued its 1996 Policy on Creed and the Accommodation of religious observances. It does not review every decision, but those that may be important from a human rights perspective. In addition to a description of the case law, trends and areas where it is anticipated the case law will continue to evolve or be clarified are identified. The review will form the basis for further research and dialogue concerning the law in Canada as it relates to this significant area of human rights.

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