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  1. The OHRC’s initiative on sexualized and gender-based dress codes

    From: Not on the menu: OHRC inquiry report on sexualized and gender-based dress codes in restaurants

    Under the Code, the OHRC works to identify, prevent and eliminate discrimination, and promote and advance human rights across the province. Our goal is to create an inclusive society where everyone is valued, treated with equal dignity and respect, and takes responsibility and action, so human rights are a lived reality. 

  2. Sexualized and gender-based dress codes may discriminate

    From: Not on the menu: OHRC inquiry report on sexualized and gender-based dress codes in restaurants

    Employers can have dress codes, but only if they do not violate the CodeHuman rights decisions dating back to the 1980s have found that dress codes that create adverse impacts based on sex violate human rights laws. Any sex-based requirements in the dress code must be legitimately linked to the requirements of the job, or they will be discriminatory.[11]

  3. Not on the menu: OHRC inquiry report on sexualized and gender-based dress codes in restaurants

    Approved by the Ontario Human Rights Commisssion: March 2017
    Available in various formats on request

    Introduction

    Since mid-2015, many restaurant workers have raised concerns about sexualized and gender-specific dress codes affecting front-of-house staff in the restaurant sector. Current or former restaurant staff have described their experiences and concerns in the media and social media, started a petition, held events and made human rights and workplace safety complaints.[1]

  4. Re: Implementing recommendations of the UN Committee on the Convention on the Elimination of all Forms of Discrimination Against Women

    February 3, 2017 - Dear Minister Naidoo-Harris: I am writing to you in keeping with the Ontario Human Rights Commission’s mandate to promote and protect human rights in Ontario. First, let me congratulate you on your recent appointment as the new Minister of Women’s Issues for Ontario.

  5. Racial harassment

    From: Human rights and newcomers

  6. 5. Context for the report findings

    From: OHRC Response to the Race Data and Traffic Stops in Ottawa Report

    The results from the OPS data collection project are situated within a context of historical police/community relations with racialized and Indigenous peoples in Ottawa and Canada generally. Many Supreme Court of Canada decisions and research studies show that systemic discrimination in policing is a reality. The York University researchers’ findings are similar to the results of other research conducted on police bias.

  7. Deputation to the Ottawa Police Services Board on the Traffic Stop Race Data Collection Project

    November 28, 2016

    Thank you for the opportunity to talk about the OPS’s Traffic Stop Race Data Collection Project. My deputation will be available online this afternoon, and the Ontario Human Rights Commission’s full report with our analysis of the findings will be available on our website tomorrow. This project was based on a 2012 settlement between the Ottawa Police Services Board and the Commission, after Chad Aiken, a young Black man, filed a human rights complaint alleging racial profiling.

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