Language selector

Site

Search results

  1. 2. Purpose of the Policy

    From: Policy on discrimination and harassment because of gender identity

    This policy sets out the position of the OHRC with respect to gender identity and is intended to help the public understand how the Code protects against discrimination and harassment because of gender identity and to assist employers and providers of services and accommodation to understand their responsibilities under the Code. The policy also can be used for educational initiatives such as the development of training materials and the revision of anti-discrimination and harassment policies so that they include gender identity.

  2. Restrictions of facilities by sex

    From: Guide to your rights and responsibilities under the Human Rights Code

    This section allows separate washrooms, examination areas, change rooms and other services that are men-only or women-only. Trans people should be provided access to facilities that are consistent with their lived gender identity.[34]


    [34] For more information, see the OHRC’s Policy on discrimination and harassment because of gender identity (2000).

  3. 13. Preventing and responding to discrimination

    From: Policy on preventing discrimination because of gender identity and gender expression

    13.1 Organizational reviews, policies and education

    Corporate liability involves more than individual instances of discrimination and harassment. Organizations also risk violating the Code if they do not address underlying problems such as systemic barriers, a poisoned environment or an organizational culture that condones discrimination.

    There are several steps organizations can take to make sure they are following the Code and human rights principles related to gender identity and expression. Strategies can include developing and implementing:

  4. Access to locker rooms for trans amateur hockey players: J.T. v. Hockey Canada et. al.

    Background

    This case involved a transgender boy, Jesse Thompson, who was denied access to the boys’ locker room the rest of his amateur hockey team used during the 2012-2013 hockey season. Jesse alleged that this resulted in him being ‘outed’ as trans, excluded from important team interaction and bonding, and exposed to harassment and bullying.

  5. OHRC Submission to the Ministry of Children and Youth Services Review of the Child and Family Services Act

    The Ontario Human Rights Commission (OHRC) welcomes the opportunity to provide input to the government’s legislated review of the Child and Family Services Act (CFSA). Section 1 of Ontario’s Human Rights Code protects children from discrimination in services, because of race, ancestry, place of origin, colour, ethnic origin, citizenship, creed, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, gender expression, marital status, family status or disability.

Pages