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  1. New OHRC report says sexualized dress codes “not on the menu”

    March 8, 2017

    To coincide with International Women’s Day, the Ontario Human Rights Commission (OHRC) has released a new report that outlines commitments made by many of Ontario’s largest and most well-known restaurant chains to eliminate discriminatory dress codes for restaurant staff. Not on the Menu: Inquiry report on sexual and gender-based dress codes in Ontario’s restaurants outlines findings from an inquiry into dress codes at certain restaurants operating across Ontario.

  2. Chief Commissioner facilitates human rights workshops at International AIDS Conference

    August 16, 2006

    Toronto - Ontario Human Rights Chief Commissioner Barbara Hall was invited to chair a number of sessions at the XVI International AIDS 2006 Conference, including two conference seminars held earlier this week on Hot Topics in Human Rights and HIV/AIDS and Time to Deliver on Stigma and Discrimination.

  3. Updated creed policy gives guidance on protecting rights

    December 10, 2015

    Toronto – The Ontario Human Rights Commission (OHRC) today releases an updated Policy on preventing discrimination based on creed. The OHRC introduced its first policy on creed in 1996. Since that time, Ontario society has grown increasingly more diverse and there have been many important legal and social developments. The update reflects today’s issues and changes to case law, and provides expanded information in areas like Indigenous Spirituality and creed-based profiling.

  4. Tough talk

    December 10, 2009

    Thunder Bay - Janice Kakegamic said when she and her friends are standing outside Dennis Franklin Cromarty High School it’s not unusual for people to drive by and yell ‘dirty Indians’ or give them the finger.

  5. Commission releases revised policies

    December 22, 2000

    Toronto - The Ontario Human Rights Commission today released two revised policies. The Commission's Policy on Drug and Alcohol Testing has been updated to reflect the Ontario Court of Appeal's recent decision in Entrop v. Imperial Oil Ltd., a human rights complaint involving the introduction of a workplace policy requiring employees in safety-sensitive positions to disclose a past or current substance abuse problem. In this case, although the problem had occurred eight years earlier and there had been no further incident of substance abuse, the employee was immediately reassigned to another position. The employee subsequently filed a human rights complaint alleging discrimination because of a handicap.

  6. Human rights policy in Ontario - 2008 edition

    December 7, 2007

    On this 45th anniversary of the Ontario Human Rights Code, I am pleased to present the fourth edition of Human Rights Policy in Ontario, a publication first introduced in 1998. I am also pleased that Carswell, a respected publisher of employment and human rights related material, is our partner in putting together this latest compendium of the Ontario Human Rights Commission’s policies and guidelines.

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