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  1. Facts and figures

    From: Annual report 2013-2014: OHRC Today

    Reaching out – adding the personal touch

    Many human rights advances start with the personal touch – with a conversation. In 2013-14, we met with and spoke with groups across Ontario. Whether it was a speech, talking on a panel, presenting a training seminar or hosting an event, we worked hard to send the message that the OHRC is a partner and resource for all Ontarians. 

    Chief Commissioner Barbara Hall met with groups or made presentations at over 45 events. Highlights included:

  2. “OHRC Today” OHRC releases its 2013-2014 Annual report

    September 4, 2014

    For immediate release

    Toronto - The Ontario Human Rights Commission (OHRC) today released its 2013-2014 Annual Report.

    Commenting on her final report before stepping down as OHRC Chief Commissioner this November, Barbara Hall said, “Our annual report provides a snapshot of the Commission’s efforts over the last 12 months to create real change and advance human rights in Ontario, with the help of partners across the province.”

  3. Join us for the Ottawa launch of the OHRC’s new Policy on preventing discrimination because of gender identity and gender expression

    Thursday, October 23, 2014 - The Ontario Human Rights Commission, Family Services Ottawa, Rainbow Service Providers Network and City of Ottawa Invite you to learn about the OHRC’s new Policy on preventing discrimination because of gender identity and gender expression.

  4. 10. Forms of discrimination

    From: Policy on preventing discrimination based on mental health disabilities and addictions

    Discrimination may take many different forms. For example, it may take place in a direct way. It can happen when individuals or organizations specifically exclude people in rental housing, employment or services, withhold benefits that are available to others, or impose extra burdens that are not imposed on others, without a legitimate or bona fide reason. This discrimination is often based on negative attitudes, stereotypes and bias about people with mental health or addiction disabilities.

  5. Discussion paper: Toward a commission policy on gender identity

    October 1999 - Research and consultation conducted by Commission staff in preparation for this paper shows that transgendered people experience negative stereotypes that have a pervasive and often traumatic impact on virtually every aspect of their lives. They are shunned by society and regarded with suspicion. Their jobs, housing and family lives are as threatened by the process of ‘coming out’ as by involuntary discovery. These are all issues that favour the development of a progressive policy to protect the human rights of transgendered persons within the legal framework of the Code.
  6. Discussion paper: Human rights issues in insurance

    October 1999 - The objective of the Paper is twofold: to promote dialogue on protecting human rights in the insurance industry and to examine alternatives to current practices by obtaining input from experts, regulators and consumers. Access to insurance in our society raises significant issues about distributive justice and fairness in the public sphere, issues that have received scant attention in Canada and in Ontario where rate setting has traditionally been viewed as a private matter.

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