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  1. Discussion paper: Toward a commission policy on gender identity

    October 1999 - Research and consultation conducted by Commission staff in preparation for this paper shows that transgendered people experience negative stereotypes that have a pervasive and often traumatic impact on virtually every aspect of their lives. They are shunned by society and regarded with suspicion. Their jobs, housing and family lives are as threatened by the process of ‘coming out’ as by involuntary discovery. These are all issues that favour the development of a progressive policy to protect the human rights of transgendered persons within the legal framework of the Code.
  2. Commission involvement in gender identity issues

    From: Discussion paper: Toward a commission policy on gender identity

    The Commission has been aware of gender identity issues as far back as 1984. The Commission has received complaints from transsexuals in areas such as access to services, employment, lack of OHIP coverage for sex reassignment surgery, and access to medical care. However, the Commission has not specifically tracked the number of complaints connected with this issue.

  3. OHRC Submission to the Ministry of Children and Youth Services Review of the Child and Family Services Act

    The Ontario Human Rights Commission (OHRC) welcomes the opportunity to provide input to the government’s legislated review of the Child and Family Services Act (CFSA). Section 1 of Ontario’s Human Rights Code protects children from discrimination in services, because of race, ancestry, place of origin, colour, ethnic origin, citizenship, creed, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, gender expression, marital status, family status or disability.

  4. III. Family status and other Code grounds

    From: The cost of caring: Report on the consultation on discrimination on the basis of family status

    Each individual’s experience of his or her family status is profoundly influenced by other aspects of their identify, such as gender, sexual orientation, age, race, marital status, or disability: this was a major theme of the submissions the Commission received. For example, the experience of an aging parent of a child with a disability will differ from that of an Aboriginal single mother in search of housing. A heterosexual married mother seeking career advancement will experience different barriers than a lesbian couple dealing with their children’s schooling.

  5. 13. Preventing and responding to discrimination

    From: Policy on preventing discrimination because of gender identity and gender expression

    13.1 Organizational reviews, policies and education

    Corporate liability involves more than individual instances of discrimination and harassment. Organizations also risk violating the Code if they do not address underlying problems such as systemic barriers, a poisoned environment or an organizational culture that condones discrimination.

    There are several steps organizations can take to make sure they are following the Code and human rights principles related to gender identity and expression. Strategies can include developing and implementing:

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