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  1. 10. Specific cases

    From: Policy on preventing discrimination based on creed

    10.1 Creed-based holidays, leaves and ritual observances

    Work and service schedules in Ontario have traditionally been structured around a Christian calendar. Many creeds require their members to engage in specific acts of worship and celebration at particular times of the day, week or year. When these observances do not coincide with existing work or service schedules, break times and statutory holidays, people may be adversely affected.

  2. 11. Corporate liability

    From: Policy on preventing discrimination because of pregnancy and breastfeeding

    Organizations have a legal duty and ultimate responsibility to maintain an environment free from discrimination and harassment because of sex. They must take steps to prevent and respond to violations of the Code or they may be held liable and face monetary penalties or other orders from a tribunal or court.

    It is unacceptable to choose to remain unaware, ignore or fail to address potential or actual human rights violations, whether or not a complaint is made.[164]

  3. 11. Managing performance and discipline

    From: Human Rights at Work 2008 - Third Edition

    The Commission recognizes the right of the employer to manage its workforce, including relying on discipline when necessary. A progressive performance management approach that takes into account accommodation needs, and is consistently applied and documented, is a best practice.

    a) Evaluating and managing performance

    It is in an organization’s best interest to follow good human resources practices, such as regular performance appraisals and documented progressive performance management of all employees.

  4. 12. Corporate liability

    From: Policy on preventing discrimination because of gender identity and gender expression

    Organizations have a legal duty and ultimate responsibility to maintain an environment free from discrimination and harassment because of gender identity and expression. They must take steps to prevent and respond to violations of the Code or they may be held “liable” and face monetary penalties or other orders from a tribunal or court.

    It is unacceptable to choose to remain unaware, ignore or fail to address potential or actual human rights violations, whether or not a complaint is made.[101]

  5. 12. Preventing and responding to discrimination

    From: Policy on preventing discrimination based on creed

    The ultimate responsibility for maintaining an environment free from discrimination and harassment rests with employers, housing providers, service providers and other responsible parties covered by the Code. It is not acceptable to choose to ignore discrimination or harassment based on creed, whether or not a human rights claim has been made.

  6. 12. Resolving human rights issues in the workplace

    From: Human Rights at Work 2008 - Third Edition

    This section addresses the many practical issues that arise when an employer is called on to resolve human rights issues using existing human rights policies and complaint resolution procedures. For more information about proactively establishing a human rights strategy to prevent and address discrimination, refer to Section IV-1a) – “Strategy to prevent and address human rights issues.”

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