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  1. Every municipality is different

    From: In the zone: Housing, human rights and municipal planning

    Municipalities in Ontario come in all shapes and sizes. Each has different issues, different neighbourhoods and different community needs. And each has a different capacity to respond to these needs. This guide offers a variety of steps municipalities can tailor to meet their unique circumstances, while also meeting their human rights responsibilities.

    About the Human Rights Code

    The Ontario Human Rights Code offers protection from discrimination in five social areas:

  2. The shadow of the law: Surveying the case law dealing with competing rights claims

    This document explains the legal backdrop for the Commission’s Policy Framework. It is divided into two main sections. The first provides an overview and summary of key legal principles from some significant legal decisions. This section aims to help readers understand the relevant legal background when seeking to conciliate or otherwise reconcile competing rights claims. The second part of the document surveys the leading cases that deal with competing rights. It also provides examples of situations where the leading cases, and the key principles from them, have been applied by courts and tribunals. It is divided by the types of rights conflicts that most commonly arise. The cases are discussed in some detail as the specific factual context of each case is so important to the rights reconciliation process.

  3. The Commission and the Human Rights Code

    From: Annual report 2006-2007

    The Ontario Human Rights Commission (the “Commission”) is an independent, arm's length agency of the provincial government. Canada’s oldest commission, it was established in 1961 to protect, promote, and advance human rights, as set out in Ontario’s Human Rights Code (the “Code”). The Commission has broad functions and powers under the Code and acts independently on behalf of the public interest.

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