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  1. Preventing discrimination because of gender identity and gender expression

    Webinar Information

    Preventing discrimination because of gender identity and gender expression

    Gender Identity and Expression Webinar

    June 04, 2014 at 11:00 am

    60 minutes

    Policy on preventing discrimination because of gender identity and gender expression overview and Q&A.

    English
  2. III. Family status and other Code grounds

    From: The cost of caring: Report on the consultation on discrimination on the basis of family status

    Each individual’s experience of his or her family status is profoundly influenced by other aspects of their identify, such as gender, sexual orientation, age, race, marital status, or disability: this was a major theme of the submissions the Commission received. For example, the experience of an aging parent of a child with a disability will differ from that of an Aboriginal single mother in search of housing. A heterosexual married mother seeking career advancement will experience different barriers than a lesbian couple dealing with their children’s schooling.

  3. Human rights settlement aims to increase gender diversity in Ottawa Police Service

    December 2, 2015

    Toronto - A settlement has been reached with the Ottawa Police in a case that alleged a female police officer was denied training, job placement and promotion opportunities because of her family status, sex and maternity leaves. The Ontario Human Rights Commission (OHRC) intervened at the Human Rights Tribunal of Ontario to address systemic barriers to promotion and advancement that women can face. 

  4. IV. Relationship Between Family Status and Other Code Grounds

    From: Policy and guidelines on discrimination because of family status

    The experience of discrimination based on family status may differ based on other aspects of a person’s identity. Whenever an issue relating to family status is raised, it is important to take into account the intersecting impact of the person’s sex, marital status, sexual orientation, race and age, as well as whether the person or his or her family member has a disability.

  5. Age & intersectionality

    From: Time for action: Advancing human rights for older Ontarians

    The Commission recognizes that persons may experience disadvantage in unique ways based on the intersection of age with other aspects of their identity. During the consultations, the Commission heard about certain groups of older persons who face particular barriers arising from the intersection of age with gender, disability, sexual orientation, race, ethnicity, religion, culture and language.

    “Women particularly suffer because of past customs, practices and traditions.” (Canadian Pensioners Concerned)

  6. 9. Mental health, addictions and intersecting Code grounds

    From: Minds that matter: Report on the consultation on human rights, mental health and addictions

    A significant theme in the consultation was how a person’s identity, based on mental health or addictions, intersects with other Code-related aspects of identity (such as race, sex or age), which can be the basis for unique or distinct forms of discrimination. People told us it was much harder to get a job, housing, or services because of discrimination based on two or more Code grounds. For example, we heard that young African Canadian men with a psychiatric disability find it harder to get housing due to stereotypes related to race, age, gender and disability.

  7. 3. The intersection of age with other grounds of discrimination

    From: Policy on discrimination against older people because of age

    The experience of age discrimination may differ based on other components of a person’s identity. For example, certain groups of older persons may experience unique barriers as a result of the intersection of age with gender, disability, sexual orientation, race, ethnicity, religion, culture and language. Please see Time for Action for a more detailed discussion of “age and intersectionality” and the particular barriers faced by certain groups.

  8. Human rights and family status (brochure)

    2012 - The Ontario Human Rights Code (the Code) provides for equal rights and opportunities, and freedom from discrimination based on various grounds. The Code recognizes the dignity and worth of every person in Ontario, in employment, housing, facilities and services, contracts, and membership in unions, trade or vocational associations. The Code protects you from discrimination in these areas based on your family status.

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