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  1. Your guide to special programs and the Human Rights Code

    December 2013 - Under the Code, all organizations are prohibited from treating people unfairly because of Code grounds, must remove barriers that cause discrimination, and must stop it when it occurs. Organizations can also choose to develop “special programs” to help disadvantaged groups improve their situation. The Code and the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms both recognize the importance of addressing historical disadvantage by protecting special programs to help marginalized groups. The Supreme Court of Canada has also recognized the need to protect “programs” established by legislation that are designed to address the conditions of a disadvantaged group.

  2. Count me in! Collecting human rights-based data

    2010 - This guide is intended to be a practical resource for human resources professionals, human rights and equity advisors, managers and supervisors, unions, and any other people or groups considering a data collection project, or seeking support to do so. This guide may be particularly helpful to readers with little or no knowledge of data collection. The guide will discuss the benefits of data collection, and will highlight key concepts and practical considerations for organizations thinking of gathering data on Code and non-Code grounds. Appendices A to F offer concrete examples of how non-profit, private and public-sector organizations have successfully developed and implemented data collection projects.
  3. Women’s rights during WW1 in Canada

    The years of WW1 saw a great remarkable spread of women’s rights and female suffrage all over the world as well as in Canada. Female suffrage is the right of women to vote. Women at this time were treated differently from men, at least in voting rights. Especially, back then, women were considered to be inferior to men, but after many years of hard work and protest, women finally gained the same equality as men.

  4. My life as a woman in Canada

    By Dr. Barbara Landau

    Women in Canada have only recently come close to equal treatment. We were not allowed to vote until WW1 (1914-18) and Quebec only granted women the vote in 1940. Even with the vote, women did not have rights separate from their husbands. Until 1929, women were not considered “persons” under our Constitution for the purpose of serving in the Senate.

    I will share a sample of my experiences that hopefully young women today will find unthinkable.