Language selector

Search

Search results

  1. 3. Gender identity and gender expression

    From: Policy on preventing discrimination because of gender identity and gender expression

    The Code does not define the grounds of gender identity, gender expression or sex. Instead, the understanding of these and other related terms, and the implications for the Code and OHRC policies, is evolving from tribunal and court decisions, social science research as well as self identity and common everyday use.

    Sex is the anatomical classification of people as male, female or intersex, usually assigned at birth.

  2. Backgrounder – Talking about gender identity and gender expression

    April 2014 ­­­­- Over the years, the Ontario Human Rights Commission (OHRC) has taken steps to address discrimination because of gender identity. In 1999, the OHRC released “Toward a Commission Policy on Gender Identity” for public comment. In 2000, the OHRC released its first Policy on discrimination and harassment because of gender identity, taking the position that the ground of “sex” could be interpreted to include gender identity. Following the release of this policy, the OHRC continued to call for explicit recognition of gender identity as a protected ground in Ontario”s Human Rights Code.

  3. Gender identity and gender expression (brochure)

    2014 - People who are transgender, or gender non-conforming, come from all walks of life. Yet they are one of the most disadvantaged groups in society. Trans people routinely experience discrimination, harassment and even violence because their gender identity or gender expression is different from their birth-assigned sex. Under the Ontario Human Rights Code (the Code) people are protected from discrimination and harassment because of gender identity and gender expression in employment, housing, facilities and services, contracts, and membership in unions, trade or professional associations.

  4. Policy on preventing discrimination because of gender identity and gender expression

    April 2014 - People who are transgender, or gender non-conforming, come from all walks of life. Yet they are one of the most disadvantaged groups in society. Trans people routinely experience discrimination, harassment and even violence because their gender identity or gender expression is different from their birth-assigned sex. Under the Ontario Human Rights Code (the Code) people are protected from discrimination and harassment because of gender identity and gender expression in employment, housing, facilities and services, contracts, and membership in unions, trade or professional associations.

  5. Gender identity and gender expression – something to celebrate in 2012

    From: Annual report 2012-2013 - Rights, Partners, Action!

    On June 15, 2012, the Government of Ontario enacted a major change in the Human Rights Code, when it added gender identity and gender expression as Code grounds. The government acknowledged the need to include explicit language about gender identity and expression, to better protect people who are often vulnerable to discrimination in Ontario.

  6. Consultation survey: Revised Policy on discrimination and harassment because of gender identity and gender expression

    Introduction

    In 2000, the Ontario Human Rights Commission (OHRC) released a policy on gender identity and human rights, taking the position that the ground of sex could be used to protect transgender people from discrimination and harassment. The OHRC also called for an amendment to the Ontario Human Rights Code (the Code) to add “gender identity” as a prohibited ground of discrimination and harassment.

  7. Appendix B: Glossary for understanding gender identity and expression

    From: Policy on preventing discrimination because of gender identity and gender expression

    The words people use to describe themselves and others are very important. The right terms can affirm identities and challenge discriminatory attitudes. The wrong ones can disempower, demean and reinforce exclusion. While these terms and explanations are considered current and appropriate at the publication of this policy, their meaning and use can evolve and change over time. Generally, when in doubt, asking a person how they self-identify is the most respectful approach.

Pages