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  1. Age discrimination (brochure)

    2012 - The Ontario Human Rights Code protects people from discrimination under the ground of age. The Code defines age as 18 years or older. However, persons age 16 or older are also protected from discrimination in housing if they are not living with their parents. This means that people cannot discriminate against you because of your age where you work or live, or when providing services.

  2. Balancing conflicting rights: Towards an analytical framework

    August 2005 - This paper will attempt to provide an analytical framework for balancing conflicting rights. This paper should be understood as a starting point that may be used as a resource for approaching further policy work on balancing conflicting rights. It will highlight the conceptual toolbox that is employed by judges, lawyers, and policy makers as they undertake the complex task of balancing conflicting rights.
  3. Communities for Change: Community Engagement Strategy & 2017 Inaugural Community Advisory Group Summit Report

    In 2015-2016, the Ontario Human Rights Commission (OHRC) undertook a strategic planning process that involved extensive conversations with nearly 300 people representing over 80 organizations across Ontario. By far, the strongest theme that emerged was the need to implement a strategic, meaningful, consistent, accessible and sustainable approach to stakeholder engagement. 

  4. Consultation paper: Education and disability - Human Rights issues in Ontario's education system

    2006 - Education is central to the life of an individual in the community. It provides opportunities for personal, social, and academic growth and development. It sets the stage for later life experiences, most especially in employment. It is also an important venue for integration into the life of the community.

  5. Consultation paper: Undue hardship standard and voluntary assumption of risk

    1999 - The purpose of this consultation is to solicit your views on proposed revisions to the Guidelines on Assessing Accommodation Requirements for Persons with Disabilities. There are two substantive issues that are being considered for revision at this time. As well, the Commission is seeking your input as to any issues that should be addressed in the Guidelines.

  6. Creed and human rights for Indigenous peoples

    What protection does the Ontario Human Rights Code offer?

    The Ontario Human Rights Code (the Code) recognizes the dignity and worth of every person in Ontario. It provides for equal rights and opportunities, and freedom from discrimination. Indigenous peoples, including status, non-status, First Nations, Métis and Inuit peoples, are included in these protections.

    The Code prohibits discrimination and harassment based on 17 personal attributes – called grounds. Creed is one of the protected grounds.

  7. Creed and the duty to accommodate: A checklist for accommodation providers

    Before you receive an accommodation request

    Minimize the need for accommodation up front by inclusively designing policies, rules, procedures, practices and spaces with everyone in mind (including people of diverse creed faiths).

    Create an open, inclusive and safe environment free of discrimination and harassment so that people feel safe and welcome to express or observe their creed and ask for creed-related accommodations, without fear of reprisal or stigma. For example, you could:

  8. Creed case law review

    May 2012 - What follows is a discussion of significant legal decisions dealing with religious and creed rights in Canada. The focus is on decisions made since the Commission issued its 1996 Policy on Creed and the Accommodation of religious observances. It does not review every decision, but those that may be important from a human rights perspective. In addition to a description of the case law, trends and areas where it is anticipated the case law will continue to evolve or be clarified are identified. The review will form the basis for further research and dialogue concerning the law in Canada as it relates to this significant area of human rights.

  9. Disability and human rights (brochure)

    2011 - The Ontario Human Rights Code (the Code) provides for equal rights and opportunities, and freedom from discrimination. The Code recognizes the dignity and worth of every person in Ontario. It applies to the areas of employment, housing, facilities and services, contracts, and membership in unions, trade or professional associations. At work, employees with disabilities are entitled to the same opportunities and benefits as people without disabilities. In some cases, they may need special arrangements or “accommodations” so they can do their job duties.

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