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  1. Human rights and mental health project arrives in Ottawa

    February 24, 2011

    Toronto - Ottawa-area residents will have their say at the Ontario Human Rights Commission’s (OHRC) next human rights and mental health round table session on Wednesday March 2, 2011. The OHRC and the Canadian Mental Health Association – Ottawa Branch will meet with consumer/survivors, members of the mental health community, people with addictions, employers and housing and service providers. They will hear personal stories of discrimination and identify solutions and best practices to deal with discrimination in the areas of housing, services and employment.

  2. Mental health round table sessions wrap up in North Bay

    March 24, 2011

    Toronto - North Bay-area residents will have their say at the Ontario Human Rights Commission’s (OHRC) final round table session on human rights and mental health issues on Monday, March 28, 2011. The OHRC, in cooperation with the North Bay Indian Friendship Centre, People for Equal Partnerships in Mental Health (PEP) and True Self, will meet with consumer/survivors, members of the mental health community, people with addictions, employers and housing and service providers. They will hear personal stories of discrimination and identify solutions and best practices to deal with discrimination in the areas of housing, services and employment.

  3. OHRC releases consultation report on human rights, mental health and addictions

    September 13, 2012

    Toronto – The Ontario Human Rights Commission (OHRC) today released Minds that matter: Report on the consultation on human rights, mental health and addictions. This report outlines what the OHRC heard in its largest-ever policy consultation across Ontario, and sets out a number of key recommendations and OHRC commitments to address human rights issues that affect people with mental health disabilities or addictions.

  4. Launch of Commission's consultation report and policy of family status

    April 18, 2007

    I am excited to have the opportunity to share with you the results of the Ontario Human Rights Commission’s (the “Commission”) groundbreaking project on discrimination on family status. The project is the first in Canada to examine the human rights implications of the barriers faced by families who are caring for children, aging parents or relatives, and family members with disabilities.

  5. Discussion paper: Toward a commission policy on gender identity

    October 1999 - Research and consultation conducted by Commission staff in preparation for this paper shows that transgendered people experience negative stereotypes that have a pervasive and often traumatic impact on virtually every aspect of their lives. They are shunned by society and regarded with suspicion. Their jobs, housing and family lives are as threatened by the process of ‘coming out’ as by involuntary discovery. These are all issues that favour the development of a progressive policy to protect the human rights of transgendered persons within the legal framework of the Code.
  6. Time for action: Advancing human rights for older Ontarians

    June 2001 - Time For Action: Advancing the Rights of Older Persons in Ontario is the final Report on the Ontario Human Rights Commission's extensive research and consultation on human rights issues facing older Ontarians. The Report presents an overview of what the Commission heard from over 100 organizations and individuals from across the province. It outlines recommendations for government and community action derived from the suggestions of the consultees, as well as “Commission Commitments”, - steps that the Commission will take toward eliminating ageism and age discrimination in the province of Ontario.
  7. Balancing conflicting rights: Towards an analytical framework

    August 2005 - This paper will attempt to provide an analytical framework for balancing conflicting rights. This paper should be understood as a starting point that may be used as a resource for approaching further policy work on balancing conflicting rights. It will highlight the conceptual toolbox that is employed by judges, lawyers, and policy makers as they undertake the complex task of balancing conflicting rights.

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