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  1. Re: Initial Proposed Employment Accessibility Standard

    May 22, 2009 - The Commission recognizes the hard work of the Employment Accessibility Standards Development Committee in preparing the initial proposed Standard that sets out important requirements to help workplaces become fully accessible for applicants and employees with disabilities. The Commission’s submission details a number of issues for consideration by the Committee as it works to develop the final proposed standard.
  2. Employers get expert help on human rights in the workplace

    November 5, 2008

    Toronto – The new edition of a human rights handbook will help employers put human rights into action. The Ontario Human Rights Commission today released the newly-updated third edition of Human Rights at Work. This plain-language guide includes examples, best practices, sample forms and other resources to help people develop and maintain inclusive, respectful workplaces that meet the standards of the Ontario Human Rights Code.

  3. Re: Input for Canada’s 2011 ILO (International Labour Organization) Article 22 Report on Discrimination (Employment & Occupation) Convention

    June 21, 2011 - Please find attached a copy of a briefing note prepared by the Ontario Human Rights Commission (OHRC) in the form requested by Ontario’s Ministry of Labour submitted to the Ministry for its input into Canada’s report on Convention 111 concerning Discrimination in Respect of Employment and Occupation as it pertains to the mandate of the OHRC.
  4. 13. Ending the employment relationship

    From: Human Rights at Work 2008 - Third Edition

    There are many instances when it will be appropriate and non-discriminatory for an employment relationship to end, whether through termination, layoffs, surplus decisions, early retirement or an employee’s resignation. In all of these, a key consideration is to make sure that the end of the employment relationship is not linked to, based on or tainted by discrimination. This consideration applies even if employees are dismissed during a probationary period or are not retained at the end of a probationary period.

  5. Policy on requiring a driver's licence as a condition of employment

    September 2000 - A driver's licence contains personal information about an individual which could lead to the classification of a job applicant according to a prohibited ground of discrimination, contrary to subsection 23(2) of the Code. Therefore, unless a driver's licence is required to enable a person to perform the essential duties of a job, it should not be requested in an application form or during an employment interview.

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