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  1. Human rights law and policy

    From: Public consultation paper: Human rights and mental health strategy

    International, federal and provincial human rights legislation prohibit discrimination against persons with mental health disabilities.[3] In Ontario, human rights protections for people with mental health disabilities and addictions are grounded in the Ontario Human Rights Code. People with mental health issues are covered under the ground of “disability” in the Code.

  2. II. Introducing the Ontario Human Rights Code

    From: Human Rights at Work 2008 - Third Edition

    1. The context for interpreting the Code

    a) Background and history

    In 1962, many laws dealing with discrimination were brought together, along with additional protections, to create the Code. The Code has been amended at various times since then. The most recent amendments were passed in December 2006. The Ontario Code only provides protection against discrimination in Ontario. There are other pieces of human rights legislation in each of the other provinces and territories and federally.

  3. Housing as a human right

    From: Right at home: Report on the consultation on human rights and rental housing in Ontario

    Adequate housing is essential to one’s sense of dignity, safety, inclusion and ability to contribute to the fabric of our neighbourhoods and societies.[3] As the Commission heard in this consultation, without appropriate housing it is often not possible to get and keep employment, to recover from mental illness or other disabilities, to integrate into the community, to escape physical or emotional violence or to keep custody of children.

  4. The opportunity to succeed: Achieving barrier-free education for students with disabilities

    2003 - The Report provides an in-depth picture of human rights issues relating to disability and education in the province of Ontario. It outlines “Actions Required” of key players in the education system to address the practices and attitudes that limit the ability of students with disabilities to access education equally. It also includes specific Commission commitments which are steps that the Commission will take to help combat discrimination against students with disabilities. The Commission’s analysis and recommendations are informed by the comprehensive input received from stakeholders throughout the course of the consultation.
  5. Anti-Black racism in the Ontario Public Service

    June 14, 2019

    Dear Secretary Davidson:

    Thank you for meeting with me on May 27, 2019 to discuss anti-Black racism in the Ontario Public Service (OPS). I am writing today to request further details on the government’s existing and planned initiatives to address systemic racism in the OPS.

    As we discussed, a group of racialized employees has asked to meet with the Ontario Human Rights Commission (OHRC) to discuss their concerns about anti-Black racism in the OPS. This meeting has been scheduled for June 19, 2019.

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