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  1. 6. Procedures for resolving complaints

    From: A policy primer: Guide to developing human rights policies and procedures

    A. Description and rationale

    The objective of a complaint resolution mechanism is to ensure that human rights issues are brought to the attention of the organization and are appropriately dealt with. A complaint resolution procedure should set out a clear, fair and effective mechanism for receiving and resolving complaints of discrimination and harassment.[15]

  2. 12. Resolving human rights issues in the workplace

    From: Human Rights at Work 2008 - Third Edition

    This section addresses the many practical issues that arise when an employer is called on to resolve human rights issues using existing human rights policies and complaint resolution procedures. For more information about proactively establishing a human rights strategy to prevent and address discrimination, refer to Section IV-1a) – “Strategy to prevent and address human rights issues.”

  3. 9. Human rights protection against sexual harassment

    From: Policy on preventing sexual and gender-based harassment

    9.1 The Ontario Human Rights Code

    Sections 1, 2, 3, 5, 6 and 9 of the Code set out the basic right to equal treatment without discrimination because of sex in services, goods and facilities, housing, contracts, employment and vocational associations.

    Sections 7(1) and (2) set out a person's right to be free from harassment based on sex and inappropriate gender-related comment and conduct in housing and employment.

    Section 7(1) states:

  4. Employment

    From: Time for action: Advancing human rights for older Ontarians

    Employment is fundamental to ensuring equal participation and equal opportunity in society. It has a direct bearing on a person’s economic status while the person is in the workforce and afterwards. Therefore, any examination of age discrimination in employment must consider the effects of practices and policies on the person while they are working as well as after they have retired. It must also consider the effect on society as a whole.

  5. Pre-employment testing for drug and alcohol use as part of an employment-relatedmedical examination

    From: Policy on drug and alcohol testing

    Testing for alcohol or drug use is a form of medical examination. Therefore, an employer considering such testing should be guided by the three-part test cited above, by the OHRC's Policy on Employment-Related Medical Information [20] and by the Ontario Court of Appeal’s decision in the Entrop case.

  6. Submission to the Employment Accessibility Standards Development Committee Regarding the Initial Proposed Employment Accessibility Standard

    May 2009 - The Ontario Human Rights Commission has reviewed the initial proposed Employment Accessibility Standard prepared by the Employment Accessibility Standards Development Committee pursuant to the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act (AODA). The Commission would like to raise the following issues for consideration by the Committee as it deliberates and prepares to submit to government a final proposed standard following the public consultation period.
  7. 8. Preventing and responding to sexual harassment

    From: Policy on preventing sexual and gender-based harassment

    The ultimate responsibility for maintaining an environment free from sexual harassment rests with employers, housing providers, educators and other responsible parties covered by the Code. From a human rights perspective, it is not acceptable to choose to stay unaware of sexual harassment, whether or not a human rights claim has been made.[170]

  8. Discrimination based on mental health or addiction disabilities - Information for housing providers (fact sheet)

    June 2014 - People with addictions have the same right to be free from discrimination as other people with disabilities. There is often a cross-over between addictions and mental health disabilities, and many people experience both. The Code also protects people from discrimination because of past and perceived disabilities. People with a mental health or addiction disability who also identify with other Code grounds (such as sex, race or age) may be distinctly disadvantaged when they try to find or keep housing. Stereotypes may exist that are based on combinations of these identities that place people at unique disadvantage.

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