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  1. Mobilizing Municipalities to address racism and discrimination

    March 15, 2010

    Toronto - The City of Vaughan, the Canadian Race Relations Foundation (CRRF) and the Ontario Human Rights Commission (OHRC) are pleased to announce an important forum that will focus on “Mobilizing Municipalities to Address Racism and Discrimination”. This partnership brings together municipal officials, community representatives, universities and the non-profit sector. Together, they have created an introductory manual for municipalities to confront racism and discrimination.

  2. Human Rights system changes take effect

    June 30, 2008

    Toronto - The Human Rights Code Amendment Act, 2006, S.O. 2006, c. 30 is now in effect. As a result, the Ontario Human Rights Commission will no longer accept complaints of discrimination. All new applications alleging discrimination are to be filed with the Human Rights Tribunal of Ontario (HRTO). Complaints that were filed with the Commission before June 30, 2008 can be changed to applications to the HRTO if the Complainant takes an active step to do so.

  3. Letter to Secretary of Cabinet Davidson on anti-Black racism in the Ontario Public Service

    October 18, 2019

    Thank you for your letter dated July 26, 2019, and for meeting with the Ontario Human Rights Commission (OHRC) on September 17 to discuss the government’s efforts to address systemic anti-Black racism in the OPS. In addition to our meetings with your office, the OHRC has met with the Black OPS employee network (BOPSers), as well as with individual employees with personal experiences of anti-Black racism in the OPS.

  4. Appendix A

    From: Fishing without fear: Report on the inquiry into assaults on Asian Canadian anglers

    The Hate Crimes Community Working Group Report and Initiatives in Schools

    The Hate Crimes Community Working Group Report

    The Hate Crimes Community Working Group defines hate activity as:

    Hate incidents: expressions of bias, prejudice and bigotry that are carried out by individuals, groups, organizations and states, directed against stigmatized and marginalized groups in communities, and intended to affirm and secure existing structures of domination and subordination.

  5. Appendix B: Summary of Commission commitments

    From: Time for action: Advancing human rights for older Ontarians

    1. The Commission will develop a public policy statement on age discrimination in 2001/2002.
    2. The Commission will develop and implement a broad public awareness campaign that addresses ageism and age discrimination.
    3. The Commission will engage in public awareness activities to educate employers and employees about their rights and responsibilities under the Code, to dispel the myths that are often associated with older workers and to encourage employers to view older workers positively.
  6. Correctional Services: update on the MCSCS Human Rights Project Charter

    From: Annual Report 2011-2012 - Human rights: the next generation

    In August 2011, after lengthy litigation, a settlement was reached on a human rights complaint filed by Michael McKinnon against the Ministry of Community Safety and Correctional Services (MCSCS). The settlement included creating a three-year Human Rights Project Charter agreement among MCSCS, the Ministry of Government Services (MGS) and the OHRC.

  7. OHRC files claim against Toronto Police for refusing to memorialize officers who end their lives due to a mental health disability incurred in the line of duty

    January 8, 2016

    On November 11, 2015, the Ontario Human Rights Commission (OHRC) filed its own application with the Human Rights Tribunal of Ontario (HRTO) alleging discrimination in employment based on disability because of the Toronto Police Service’s (TPS) failure to include on its Memorial Wall officers who end their lives as a result of a mental health disability incurred in the line of duty.

  8. Roles and responsibilities

    From: The opportunity to succeed: Achieving barrier-free education for students with disabilities

    Responsibility for addressing the needs of students with disabilities is assigned to different parties including the Ministries of Education and of Training, Colleges and Universities, post-secondary institutions, schools and school boards, educators, specialized professionals, parents and students themselves. In the private education system, each individual school or post-secondary institution, as a service-provider, is responsible for accommodating students with disabilities up to the point of undue hardship.

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