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  1. Example 4 - Code right v. Charter right: Employer distributing Bibles and religious advice

    From: Competing Human Rights

    Employer distributing Bibles and religious advice

    Here is an example of a Code right (creed) versus a Charter right (freedom of religion and expression).

    encourages them to attend church meetings, gives each a Bible as a gift for Christmas and asks them if they share his opinions on a variety of matters. Employees have made it clear that they do not welcome or appreciate his comments and conduct in their workplace and that they plan to file a claim under the Ontario Human Rights Code. This could be argued as a competing rights situation because:

  2. Employers get expert help on human rights in the workplace

    November 5, 2008

    Toronto – The new edition of a human rights handbook will help employers put human rights into action. The Ontario Human Rights Commission today released the newly-updated third edition of Human Rights at Work. This plain-language guide includes examples, best practices, sample forms and other resources to help people develop and maintain inclusive, respectful workplaces that meet the standards of the Ontario Human Rights Code.

  3. Age & intersectionality

    From: Time for action: Advancing human rights for older Ontarians

    The Commission recognizes that persons may experience disadvantage in unique ways based on the intersection of age with other aspects of their identity. During the consultations, the Commission heard about certain groups of older persons who face particular barriers arising from the intersection of age with gender, disability, sexual orientation, race, ethnicity, religion, culture and language.

    “Women particularly suffer because of past customs, practices and traditions.” (Canadian Pensioners Concerned)

  4. Can I fire a woman whose pregnancy is preventing her from doing the job she was hired to do?

    It is discrimination if you fire, demote or lay off an employee because she is or may become pregnant or she is away on maternity leave or disability leave related to pregnancy. Employers have a duty to accommodate a pregnant woman unless it would cause undue hardship. This may include changing her job duties temporarily or providing time off work.

    English
  5. Discussion paper: Human rights issues in insurance

    October 1999 - The objective of the Paper is twofold: to promote dialogue on protecting human rights in the insurance industry and to examine alternatives to current practices by obtaining input from experts, regulators and consumers. Access to insurance in our society raises significant issues about distributive justice and fairness in the public sphere, issues that have received scant attention in Canada and in Ontario where rate setting has traditionally been viewed as a private matter.
  6. Q&A on the duty to accommodate

    Webinar Information

    Q&A on the duty to accommodate

    Human Rights and the Duty to Accommodate - Q&A

    March 18, 2014 at 11:00 am

    60 minutes

    Accommodation rights and responsibilities under the Ontario Human Rights Code.

    English
  7. Competing human rights

    Webinar Information

    Competing human rights

    Competing Human Rights Webinar

    August 01, 2013 at 11:00 am

    60 minutes

    Overview of the Policy and framework for addressing competing rights.

    English

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