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  1. Employers get expert help on human rights in the workplace

    November 5, 2008

    Toronto – The new edition of a human rights handbook will help employers put human rights into action. The Ontario Human Rights Commission today released the newly-updated third edition of Human Rights at Work. This plain-language guide includes examples, best practices, sample forms and other resources to help people develop and maintain inclusive, respectful workplaces that meet the standards of the Ontario Human Rights Code.

  2. Age discrimination (brochure)

    2012 - The Ontario Human Rights Code protects people from discrimination under the ground of age. The Code defines age as 18 years or older. However, persons age 16 or older are also protected from discrimination in housing if they are not living with their parents. This means that people cannot discriminate against you because of your age where you work or live, or when providing services.

  3. Indigenous Peoples in Ontario and the Ontario Human Rights Code (brochure)

    2015 - The Ontario Human Rights Code is a provincial law that gives everybody the right to be free from discrimination in five parts of society – called social areas – based on one or more grounds. The five social areas are: employment, housing, services and facilities (such as education, health care, police, government, shops or restaurants), unions and vocational associations, and contracts or agreements.

  4. Time for action: Advancing human rights for older Ontarians

    June 2001 - Time For Action: Advancing the Rights of Older Persons in Ontario is the final Report on the Ontario Human Rights Commission's extensive research and consultation on human rights issues facing older Ontarians. The Report presents an overview of what the Commission heard from over 100 organizations and individuals from across the province. It outlines recommendations for government and community action derived from the suggestions of the consultees, as well as “Commission Commitments”, - steps that the Commission will take toward eliminating ageism and age discrimination in the province of Ontario.
  5. Submission of the Ontario Human Rights Commission to the Ministry of Labour regarding the consultations on ending mandatory retirement

    September 2004 - This submission is in response to the Ministry of Labour’s public consultation on ending mandatory retirement.The Ontario Human Rights Commission (“OHRC”) commends the Ministry for these steps towards ending mandatory retirement.
  6. OHRC successfully challenges restrictions to benefits for workers aged 65+

    May 31, 2018

    Toronto – The OHRC intervened in Talos v Grand Erie District School Board to challenge the provision of Ontario’s Human Rights Code that allowed employers to cut or reduce benefits to workers aged 65 and over. The Human Rights Tribunal of Ontario found that subsection 25(2.1) of the Code, as well as related provisions in the Employment Standards Act and its regulations, amount to age discrimination and violate the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms.

  7. Discussion paper: Human rights issues in insurance

    October 1999 - The objective of the Paper is twofold: to promote dialogue on protecting human rights in the insurance industry and to examine alternatives to current practices by obtaining input from experts, regulators and consumers. Access to insurance in our society raises significant issues about distributive justice and fairness in the public sphere, issues that have received scant attention in Canada and in Ontario where rate setting has traditionally been viewed as a private matter.
  8. Chief Commissioner commends plans to allow flexibility and choice in retirement

    May 30, 2003

    Toronto - Chief Commissioner Keith Norton of the Ontario Human Rights Commission today praised the government's move to act on providing more flexibility and choice in the area of retirement. This is consistent with the Commission's recommendation made in June 2001 for Ontario workers aged 65 or older. "The Bill introduced by the government yesterday respecting the age of retirement is significant and a step in the right direction. For some older workers, maintaining or even obtaining employment can have profound implications on their sense of worth, their dignity and their economic security. They should be judged on their ability to perform a job, and not have to leave their work just because they reach a certain age," stated Chief Commissioner Keith Norton, adding that, "Although the Bill provides for a transition period until January 1, 2005, it does not prevent any forward-looking employer and bargaining agent from implementing the provisions before that date."

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