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  1. Interrupted childhoods: Over-representation of Indigenous and Black children in Ontario child welfare

    When child welfare authorities remove children from their caregivers because of concerns about abuse or neglect, it can be traumatic and tragic for everyone involved – children, their families and even their communities. Being admitted into care comes with far-reaching consequences that can have a negative impact on children’s future ability to thrive. It is an unfortunate reality that some children need to be placed in care to keep them safe. But too often, for First Nations, Métis, Inuit, Black and other racialized families, being involved with the child welfare system and having a child removed is fraught with concerns that the system is not meeting their or their children’s needs, is harmful, and may be discriminatory.

  2. Appendix B: Survey questionnaire

    From: Taking the pulse: People's opinions on human rights in Ontario

    This survey is being conducted on behalf of the Ontario Human Rights Commission. The questions are general and your responses will not be attributed to you in any way. It will take approximately 15 minutes to complete.

    1. Are you 18 years of age or older and a resident of Ontario? (Select one response only)

          Yes

          No       [TERMINATE]

  3. Appendix A: Methodology

    From: Taking the pulse: People's opinions on human rights in Ontario

    The OHRC commissioned the Environics Research Group to do a public opinion survey on human rights in Ontario. The OHRC followed the Ontario Government procurement process for research services and the Environics Research Group was the successful vendor of record.

    Environics conducted the survey between January 24 and February 2, 2017, and then provided the OHRC with cross-tabulation data tables and an analysis of findings along with the complete survey data file.

  4. Business Plan 2017/18 - 2019/20

    Section 1: Executive Summary

    The Ontario Human Rights Commission (OHRC) is an arm’s-length agency of the government of Ontario established under the Ontario’s Human Rights Code. The function of the OHRC is to protect, promote and advance respect for human rights in Ontario, as well as identify and promote the elimination of discriminatory practices, all in the public interest. The OHRC works in many different ways to fulfill this mandate, including through education, policy development, public inquiries and litigation.

  5. Policy statement on the duty to accommodate under the Ontario Human Rights Code

    The Ontario Human Rights Code (the Code) recognizes the dignity and worth of every person in Ontario. The Code provides for equal rights and opportunities, and freedom from discrimination. It applies to the areas of employment, housing, facilities and services (including education, health care, etc.), contracts, and membership in unions, trade or professional associations. It covers specific grounds, such as disability, creed, family status, sex, and gender identity.

  6. Starting in a “good way”: towards trusting relationships with Indigenous peoples

    From: A bold voice: Annual report 2016-2017


    Our strategic focus:

    The OHRC will embody human rights by engaging in and sustaining trusting relationships with First Nations, Métis and Inuit communities and groups. These relationships will be built on dignity and respect, and on working to advance reconciliation and substantive equality. We will contribute to nation-wide efforts that recognize the enduring impact of colonialism on Indigenous peoples. We will work in collaboration to support Indigenous communities as they determine and advance their own human rights goals and priorities.

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