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  1. January 29 a day to remember the tragic consequences of hate

    January 29, 2018

    One year ago today – January 29, 2017 – Canadians learned of the mass murder of six people, and the wounding of many others at a Centre culturel islamique de Québec in Quebec City. I was riveted by my tiny screen as the events were reported in real time on social media late into the night – a bystander watching from behind a glass window powerless to do anything.

  2. Appendix B: Survey questionnaire

    From: Taking the pulse: People's opinions on human rights in Ontario

    This survey is being conducted on behalf of the Ontario Human Rights Commission. The questions are general and your responses will not be attributed to you in any way. It will take approximately 15 minutes to complete.

    1. Are you 18 years of age or older and a resident of Ontario? (Select one response only)


          No       [TERMINATE]

  3. Appendix A: Methodology

    From: Taking the pulse: People's opinions on human rights in Ontario

    The OHRC commissioned the Environics Research Group to do a public opinion survey on human rights in Ontario. The OHRC followed the Ontario Government procurement process for research services and the Environics Research Group was the successful vendor of record.

    Environics conducted the survey between January 24 and February 2, 2017, and then provided the OHRC with cross-tabulation data tables and an analysis of findings along with the complete survey data file.

  4. Business Plan 2017/18 - 2019/20

    Section 1: Executive Summary

    The Ontario Human Rights Commission (OHRC) is an arm’s-length agency of the government of Ontario established under the Ontario’s Human Rights Code. The function of the OHRC is to protect, promote and advance respect for human rights in Ontario, as well as identify and promote the elimination of discriminatory practices, all in the public interest. The OHRC works in many different ways to fulfill this mandate, including through education, policy development, public inquiries and litigation.

  5. Policy statement on the duty to accommodate under the Ontario Human Rights Code

    The Ontario Human Rights Code (the Code) recognizes the dignity and worth of every person in Ontario. The Code provides for equal rights and opportunities, and freedom from discrimination. It applies to the areas of employment, housing, facilities and services (including education, health care, etc.), contracts, and membership in unions, trade or professional associations. It covers specific grounds, such as disability, creed, family status, sex, and gender identity.

  6. Opening statement: Standing Committee on Canadian Heritage Systemic Racism and Religious Discrimination M-103

    September 20, 2017

    The Government has the power to take action to protect people who are being harmed by racism and Islamophobia, and we call on it to boldly do so. There is considerable scope for the Government to develop positions, policies and programs that promote inclusion and respect, especially for racial and religious minorities. These types of actions are consistent with the values of Canadians and the Charter.

  7. Leadership needed to fight racism

    July 25, 2017

    A few months ago, I visited Thunder Bay and had the opportunity to speak with members of the Indigenous community. Community members told me about their concerns related to policing and child welfare, trafficking of Indigenous women and girls, and everyday racism in almost every facet of their lives including employment, housing, healthcare and retail. Most strikingly, people talked about being “garbaged” – literally having garbage thrown at them while walking down the street, all because of their Indigenous ancestry. I brought these concerns to the leaders that I met later in the day, including the Mayor and police.