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  1. 4. Designing application forms

    From: Human Rights at Work 2008 - Third Edition

    a) General principles

    This section outlines key considerations for application forms and parts of application forms that raise concerns about Code violations. Employers can use this information to make sure that the application forms they use are non-discriminatory and relate only to qualifications and requirements relevant to the job and the hiring decision. When application forms include inappropriate questions relating to Code grounds, an inference can be made that such questions may have influenced a decision not to hire.

  2. 5. Interviewing and making hiring decisions

    From: Human Rights at Work 2008 - Third Edition

    This section describes the human rights issues that commonly arise in interviews, some of the types of questions that may or may not be asked, and how to make hiring decisions that do not contravene the Code. Supervisors, managers and human resources staff who are responsible for making hiring decisions must be trained and educated to identify and eliminate discrimination, harassment and barriers to advancement for persons protected by the Code.

  3. 9.5. Intersections with race and related grounds

    From: Minds that matter: Report on the consultation on human rights, mental health and addictions

    We heard about the different types of intersecting discrimination occurring because of race, citizenship, ethnic origin, place of origin, ancestry, colour or creed, in addition to mental health disabilities and/or addictions. We were told how perceptions about people’s disabilities can contribute to negative perceptions based on race in different ways.

  4. 4. The OHRC’s 2008-2012 priorities, initiatives and impacts

    From: Ontario Human Rights Commission Submission regarding Section 57 three-year statutory review of the Ontario Human Rights System

    In November 2008, following public town hall meetings with individuals and groups across the province, the OHRC finalized strategic and business plans to guide its work under its new mandate for the following three years. Our aim is to educate, empower and mobilize partners in communities across the province to raise awareness, help identify concerns and implement solutions.

  5. History teaches us that difficult conversations about religion must start from respect and inclusion, not hate and division

    December 10, 2015

    Today is International Human Rights Day—the day the United Nations General Assembly adopted the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. The human rights movement was a direct response to widespread antisemitism which ultimately led to the Holocaust. By adopting the Universal Declaration in 1948, Canada and the international community rightly said, “Never again.”

  6. Statement from the Ontario Human Rights Commission on the recent attack on the Islamic Cultural Centre of Quebec City

    February 15, 2017

    Beyond remorse – to action. It has now been two weeks since the tragic attack on a Quebec City mosque. Many individuals and organizations across Canada properly voiced their outrage, their sorrow and their support for our Muslim neighbours. But there is more to be done – and this is the time to do it. Taking lasting action is the best way to remember and honour the victims. First, we must acknowledge that Islamophobia is real, and is embedded across our society including right here in Ontario.

  7. Together the OHRC and the OFIFC take steps towards reconciliation

    July 10, 2017

    LONDON – On July 8, 2017, the Ontario Human Rights Commission (OHRC) and the Ontario Federation of Indigenous Friendship Centres (OFIFC) signed an agreement with the ultimate goal of ending anti-Indigenous discrimination in Ontario. This agreement sets the stage for future collaboration with urban Indigenous communities that is based on trust, dignity, respect, and a shared commitment to reconciliation and substantive equality.

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