Language selector

Site

Search results

  1. Appendix 2 – Human rights: the historical context

    From: Teaching human rights in Ontario - A guide for Ontario schools

    Much of Canada's human rights legislation was developed in the 20th century. The Constitution of the United States deals in large part with human rights; however, the British North America (BNA) Act did not address the issue at all. It focused instead on the division of powers between the federal government and the provinces and territories.

  2. Appendix 6 – The Code and the classroom: taking the human rights temperature of your school (for students)

    From: Teaching human rights in Ontario - A guide for Ontario schools

    Introduction

    This activity is based on “Taking the Human Rights Temperature of Your School” which was adapted from the United Nations’ Universal Declaration of Human Rights.[4]

    You can evaluate your school’s human rights climate using criteria derived from both the United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights (the Declaration) and the Ontario Human Rights Code (the Code). The questions here are adapted from both of these sources.

  3. Appendix A – Target change objectives

    From: Human Rights Project Charter - OHRC, MCSCS, MGS

    Overall Change Objective

    • The identification and elimination of any discrimination that may exist in all employment and service activities of the Correctional Services Division of MCSCS.

    Specific Change Objectives

    A. Aboriginal Issues

    • Ensure that special focus on the needs and concerns of Aboriginal people, including Aboriginal employees and inmates, is retained in all Human Rights Project activity.
    • Enhance ongoing efforts to promote the recruitment, selection, promotion, and retention of Aboriginal employees in MCSCS.
  4. Appendix A - Target change objectives

    From: Human Rights Project Charter - TPS & TPSB

    Overall Change Objectives

    • The identification and elimination of any discrimination that may exist in employment policies of the Toronto Police Services Board (“TPSB”) and the practices of the Toronto Police Service (“TPS”) that may be contrary to the Ontario Human Rights Code.
    • The identification and elimination of any discrimination that may exist in the provision of policing services by the TPS to the residents of the City of Toronto that may be contrary to the Ontario Human Rights Code.
  5. Appendix A: Glossary of terms

    From: By the Numbers: A statistical profile of people with mental health and addiction disabilities in Ontario

    Census family: A married couple and the children, if any, of either or both spouses; a couple living common-law and the children, if any, of either or both partners; or, a lone parent of any marital status with at least one child living in the same dwelling and the child or children. All members of a particular census family live in the same dwelling. A couple may be of opposite or same sex.

  6. Appendix B: Policy development process

    From: Policy on competing human rights

    Over the past several years, the OHRC has taken many steps to advance understanding of how best to address competing rights. In 2005, the OHRC began the dialogue by releasing a research paper entitled, Balancing Conflicting Rights: Towards an Analytical Framework.[97] The paper provided the public with preliminary information that would promote discussion and further research without taking any firm policy positions.

  7. Appendix B: Policy position

    From: Not on the menu: OHRC inquiry report on sexualized and gender-based dress codes in restaurants

    OHRC policy position on sexualized and gender-specific dress codes

    Some Ontario employers require female employees to dress in a sexualized or gender-specific way at work, such as expecting women to wear high heels, short skirts, tight clothing or low-cut tops. These kinds of dress codes reinforce stereotypical and sexist notions about how women should look and may violate Ontario’s Human Rights Code.

Pages