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  1. 8. Meeting the accommodation needs of employees on the job

    From: Human Rights at Work 2008 - Third Edition

    a) Duty to accommodate to the point of undue hardship

    The Code requires an effort, short of undue hardship, to accommodate the needs of persons who are protected by the Code. It would be unfair to exclude someone from the workplace or activities in the workplace because their Code-protected needs are different from the majority. The principle of accommodation applies to all grounds of the Code, but accommodation issues in employment most often relate to the needs of:

  2. 9.5. Intersections with race and related grounds

    From: Minds that matter: Report on the consultation on human rights, mental health and addictions

    We heard about the different types of intersecting discrimination occurring because of race, citizenship, ethnic origin, place of origin, ancestry, colour or creed, in addition to mental health disabilities and/or addictions. We were told how perceptions about people’s disabilities can contribute to negative perceptions based on race in different ways.

  3. A bit of history

    Working, buying a home

    Ontario’s pioneering Fair Employment Practices Act of 1951 prohibited discriminatory employment practices, and a year earlier the Conveyancing and Law of Property Act was amended to end real estate provisions that required someone buying a house to agree that their property “shall never be sold, assigned, transferred, leased to, and shall never been occupied by any person of Jewish, Hebrew, Semitic, Negro or coloured race or blood.”

  4. A bit of history...

    From: Annual Report 2011-2012 - Human rights: the next generation

    Celebrating International Human Rights Day, circa 1962

    While we deplore and condemn violations of human rights elsewhere in the world and stand aghast before such ugly manifestations as the Berlin Wall, we must never cease to concern ourselves with those walls of prejudice which still exist in our own community – and sometimes in our own minds – and which deny our fellow citizens that justice and equality of opportunity which is their inalienable right. Justice, like charity, should begin at home.

  5. A half-century of human rights

    From: Annual report 2012-2013 - Rights, Partners, Action!

    June 15, 2012 was the 50th anniversary of Ontario’s Human Rights Code – the first such code in Canada. To mark this important event, we worked with partners across Ontario to look back at how human rights had progressed over the 50 years, and to look ahead to the human rights of tomorrow. Highlights include a commemorative plaque and the “proclamation project” with municipalities across Ontario.

  6. A message from Chief Commissioner Renu Mandhane

    From: Annual Report 2015 - 2016: Reconnect. Renew. Results.

    Reconnect. Renew. Results.

    2015-16 has been a time of transition for the Ontario Human Rights Commission (OHRC) – and for me personally, as I took on the role of Chief Commissioner in November. As is my nature, I adopted the “dive right in” approach and, just over six months into my term, the OHRC is well-positioned to embark on a bold new approach that emphasizes community trust, human rights accountability, and measurable impact.

  7. Across the curriculum: ideas for other activities

    From: Teaching human rights in Ontario - A guide for Ontario schools

    This section includes ideas for other curriculum areas, like role-play techniques in drama classes. Where appropriate, additional references have been provided, but many of the resources are already in this package. For example, to do role-plays during dramatic arts activities, use the case studies in the Students' handouts.

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